adhd books

HI brains! Can you recommend me some good books about adhd? I’m 30 and was diagnosed about 2 months ago. I want to read sth that would give me a better understanding of what adhd is and how to live the life I want to live with it.
Please name the book and say why you think it’s good (or not good)
I’m looking at Thom Hartmann’s “Hunter in a Farmer’s World” - is it any good?

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I would recommend the following two which I have read:

I personally haven’t read it, but I hear good things about this one:

I would not recommend this one, as it’s very clinical and way too dense. Lots of research listed.

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@nastasi

In my humble opinion anything written by Hallowell should be considered. I attended a couple of live workshops with him presenting . . . He is a “Brain” himself . . . That gives him first hand experience, expertise, and extra credibility. His writing is clear and quite readable. I am not at all someone who reads easily. Had no problem reading his books. :sunglasses:

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Dr. Hallowell also has dyslexia.

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I knew I forgot something . . . :joy:

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Actually surprised that you said you wouldn’t recommend Barkley’s book :joy:

I was about to comment that Barkley’s probably the greatest source of information on ADHD including his books in addition to his medical journals, scholarly articles, and research.

I actually felt that Barkley conveys scientific knowledge accurately, but in a manner in which it is easily conveyed to the reader, without dumbing down or leaving out important information.

Although to be fair, even though it’s not like I have any scientific background or anything, because i’m 17, I am a fairly science and research orientated person, and I have taken college courses for research and sciences, so maybe it’s just easier to read in comparison to other research based sources.

To be fair, the book you read from Dr.Barkley, is a bit more of an all around source. It’s there to try to efficiently explain everything important about ADHD, through the most evident and science based methodologies, while being user friendly simultaneously to those for personal use, and for those in education/clinical practice. So maybe a book solely direct for personal use would be better.

Have you read any of his other books ?

I think Ned Hallowell is fantastic source of information as well, although some of his information is done in a way similar to Barkley’s, in that it’s given in a scientific manner, efficiently, not over complicated, but is not missing important details. But sometimes I’ve seen that some of his things, do seem to push the boundary in terms of being almost too user friendly, that it may leave important details and such out, for the sake of being more user friendly. Although they are both fantastic sources IMO, and just about the best sources there are. But I do kinda see where user friendly may sometimes be an issue.

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Dr.Russel A Barkley books. IMO the best source for ADHD in general. Very well done, in everything, can give very concise, accurate, evident, scientifically credible and diverse information and explanations to virtually everything that needs to be explained for ADHD. IMO he’s very user friendly, and easy to read, but someone else commented that they find him to be the opposite, so it could just be the fact that I do read scientific research itself, and I am research/scientifically literate, so it could just be that it seems way easier than his actual research, which if you enjoy that type of stuff, I recommend reading.

In fact over any other book, I recommend watching this, repeated if needed, save it,

it’s 3 hours long, there is a shorter version of clips on youtube that’s about 30 min long, but I recommend the whole 3 hours when ever you can, and rewatching it from time to time. The 3 hours is very concise and short compared to the amount of research it could save you from doing, this is like my goto ADHD source. He has other seminars and things, but this is generally the best one overall for ADHD, as in it gives the needed details and explanations, does not feel like a mundane and grueling instructional or school video to watch it, and it covers, many, many, many important aspect of ADHD in a very well done manner.

I’ve been starting to read this book called Atomic Habits by James Clear. So far it seems to be pretty good, it sold over a million copies and was NY times bestseller. It’s of course about creating habits and structure to your life, which I think is a vital area that anyone with ADHD can approve upon using psychosocial behavioral treatments and such; just an overall area that can be further improved via means of non-pharmaceutical interventions, which is always great to implement when you can.

There’s also this book called Choices (Taking control of your life and Making it matter) by Melody Beattie. It’s kinda like a self help book, maybe some light philosophy. It’s not directed specifically towards ADHD, but especially when you struggle or feel lost in life etc. Which many brains with ADHD may from time to time, you may find some relief and insight in this book. Beattie writes a lot of self help books on codependency relationships, this book isn’t really about that though. You don’t have to read it front to back, you can pick random chapters and read from there, it’s done in a way that it has sections that kinda have some moral theme or problem etc. behind that sections, and each chapter, is a story, relating to someone’s subjective experience with that, which can make you feel not alone, and also helps by making you kinda think of others. Sometimes she kinda outta no where describes things of her own life, and as well as her idk, epiphanies? Through like a religious/spiritual vacation she took to sacred mountains in China. She goes through advice, and sometimes doesn’t, leaving you to ponder the advice for yourself, which is sometimes easier, when you have an outsider perspective, of a very similar experience to yours, but you’re looking from the outside in. The book by literary means is in no way stellar, it’s not poorly written or anything, but there are obvious parts in my opinion that could’ve been ameliorated greatly in terms of the literary elements, and writing style. I noticed this even off of Adderall/Dexedrine (I note this, because in addition to my very bad ADHD, I have dyslexia, and anisocoria above the brain damage threshold, and word aphasia, but on medication, my vocabulary, line of reasoning, and ability to read and comprehend it well is greatly appreciated, so it’s far more likely for me to note realize if a book is lacking in certain ways, especially literary elements when I’m off medication, but even reading off meds, I felt there were some not so well-written and stylistic errors to it that bothered me a bit.) The book does have some religious/spiritual/pervasive force type things in it, mostly religious though. Personally I’m not religious or spiritual by any means, while most of the religious references etc. were decently used, I did feel that the book had a very weird perspicuity at parts, to go long periods without involving religious concepts etc. but then sporadically seemed to mention, nothing but religious concepts to the point it was a bit distracting, and it took away sometimes with previous sentiments, but a decent amount of the religious and spiritual implementation was fine, just it would randomly stop and then berate you with the same idea back to back to back, which ruined the flow and things, but wouldn’t say it made it a bad book or anything, just took away from it a bit. What I also mean by berating you with religious ideas that took away from previous sentiments, is it would go from like a story of someone’s spouse cheating on them, and explain about self care and not letting someone else define you, etc. etc. And then maybe a bit of pervasive force, that you can’t control everything in life. Then it would cut to the author talking about her journey in the mountains. then after 2 stories, the following like 3 or 4 stories might be of unfaithfulness again or something, but instead of diversifying the philosophical sentiments, like using religion, self care, philosophies, and spirituality how it does in other parts of the book, where it using combinations of them, or little bits here in there, you sporadically get the same religious sentiment repeated like 4 times consecutively, like your partner cheated but don’t worry because it was “God’s plan” then the next one might say virtually the same thing, but say “Divine plan” etc. It even takes away from the religious sentiments, because it just repeats them and diminished their value, but only at certain parts of the book. It’s worth noting that, even though it may seem bias, because i’m not religious, this didn’t bother me for good portions of the book and I thought it well well implemented in some sections, but it became bothersome and redundant when it became repetitive and out of nowhere, and then some of them go a little absurd or goofy, like “oh you forgot to get milk at the grocery store, don’t worry, it’s all gods plan.” And while at first it didn’t bother me, when it became the same sentence and story writing 4 or 5 times, with slightly different words, it diminished the other good qualities of the book, so in terms of stylistic and literally, the book is lacking a bit, but some of the general premises are good.

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I’d also note in addition the the Barkley book that was previously listed by another user, I would recommend Taking Charge of Adult ADHD by Barkley, you may find it to be a bit more user friendly, than the other.

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@Chickentender

I made no comment about Barkley’s book. I am not much of a reader . . . and have not read any of Barkley . . . So I have no opinion.

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Actually surprised that you said you wouldn’t recommend Barkley’s book :joy:

I was about to comment that Barkley’s probably the greatest source of information on ADHD including his books in addition to his medical journals, scholarly articles, and research.

I actually felt that Barkley conveys scientific knowledge accurately, but in a manner in which it is easily conveyed to the reader, without dumbing down or leaving out important information.

Although to be fair, even though it’s not like I have any scientific background or anything, because i’m 17, I am a fairly science and research orientated person, and I have taken college courses for research and sciences, so maybe it’s just easier to read in comparison to other research based sources.

To be fair, the book you read from Dr.Barkley, is a bit more of an all around source. It’s there to try to efficiently explain everything important about ADHD, through the most evident and science based methodologies, while being user friendly simultaneously to those for personal use, and for those in education/clinical practice. So maybe a book solely direct for personal use would be better.

Have you read any of his other books ?

I think Ned Hallowell is fantastic source of information as well, although some of his information is done in a way similar to Barkley’s, in that it’s given in a scientific manner, efficiently, not over complicated, but is not missing important details. But sometimes I’ve seen that some of his things, do seem to push the boundary in terms of being almost too user friendly, that it may leave important details and such out, for the sake of being more user friendly. Although they are both fantastic sources IMO, and just about the best sources there are. But I do kinda see where user friendly may sometimes be an issue.

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Yeah, I replied to the wrong comment, sorry about that, I’m gonna chalk that one up to sleep deprivation :confused:

Although I would recommend Barkley as a great source, especially his seminars/videos on youtube.

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Perfection is not to be ignored, as it can inspire us . . .

But let’s not insist on achieving it . . . as it will perspire us :joy:

(Tangential humor . . . does however require us . . .

To . . .

Oops! I forget where this was headed . . . :sunglasses::joy:

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I read the book The ADHD Advantage , by Dale Archer, MD, it is a fantastic book, but I only think it helps people who only have have ADHD, without dyspraxia, without ASD.image

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