Alcohol......


#1

So I have never been a huge drinker, just used to get drunk maybe 1-2 times a month, would have rather smoked weed. Since being a on Ritalin 5 or so years, i forget exact, not much weed smoking at all, but lately drinking like a alcoholic, i have done all sorts of drugs and have no problem coming off them/mentally overcoming addiction, but lately with alcohol it has felt like say for example meth, where i wake up in the morning with panic attacks and the shakes and think i need a drink but have resisted drinking at work and wait till after work to get stuck in, this is a short term early stages thing so wanna figure out a solution before it gets out of hand, can anyone give advice or experience’s with alcohol? Thanks in advance.


#2

There is way more to this story, but i am trying to keep it short so someone can read it without getting side tracked :wink:


#3

Also, i went on valium for a week from doc and that stopped the drinking, but then after that a couple of days of not drinking it crept back up to the same level, i have some phenibut coming which seems to replace the alcohol, but cant be a long term solution, also i am training hard for a mountain bike race which normally keeps addictions at bay, but with alcohol i can’t seem to get a handle on it.


#4

I don’t have any experience with addiction (/alcoholism) myself. However, I want to applaud you for already noticing it is becoming a real problem and having the power to not drink before and during work. I do think it sounds serious enough that it might be a good idea to actually get some real, professional help. You deserve getting help and it not becoming worse. :heart:


#5

Thank you Nicole, i think your rite and i am trying to line up a good mate that used to be a drug and alcohol counciler to talk to, so keeping it low key but still trying to sort out properly :slight_smile:


#6

Why is adhd so hard like this and talking to “normal” people they just don’t get it or get sick of hearing about it, grrrrrrr…


#7

Substance abuse is extremely common among brains. It’s a way of self medicating the ADHD symptoms or the mental health symptoms that arise from dealing with all the difficulties from our ADHD.

My family is rife with alcoholism, on both sides, so I’ve always been extremely cautious with drinking. I’ll have a cocktail once or twice a year, and some whiskey and/or bailey’s on St. Patty’s, but that’s it. I basically treat it like radiation…even a little bit might trigger the addictive personality traits that seem to be prevalent in my family. I already struggle with a food and/or sugar addiction, so I don’t fool myself that it’s something I can avoid. It also helps that when I drink, the feeling of being tipsy and out of control of myself is one that I absolutely hate. So, I have no incentive to feel that way.

Honestly, in my opinion we treat alcohol way to cavalierly for what a dangerous substance it is. Alcohol producers glorify it in advertising. No one provides education on it in school to teens. Drinking to excess is often treated as a right of passage into adulthood, instead of a treat or a delicacy to enjoy occasionally. I think marijuana is way less dangerous.

My husband is an alcoholic. I’ve been through programs with him, and gone to AlAnon (for people affected by an alcoholic) and worked the program. My father is an alcoholic. Many of my aunts, uncles, and cousins are. In my experience, the only way to prevent addiction is to stop using the substance.

I hope your addiction counselor friend can help you.

TL;DR I’m a teetotaler, and simply made a choice not to drink ever. I’ve tried over the years to cut out any substances I can get addicted to. Alcohol, caffeine, sugar, etc…I don’t know if that would work for you.


#8

I am a recovering alcoholic. I had a wake-up call a few years ago which changed my life and led to my diagnosis of ADHD and bipolar disorder. There was treatment, counseling and AA, but I can’t tell for sure what was most effefctive (I am currently 2.5 years sober). Most often, the recommended methods of recovery are 12 step programs like alcoholics anonymous (AA). I would go to many meetings and while is was helpful to hear about how it helped others and talk openly about my own struggles, it doesn’t address any medical aspects of the disease. It can’t address cravings or withdrawals, and I’ve heard many people have a very hard time with this. My own experience was one where I never gained much hope or accountability.
There are medication options which you could talk to your doctor about. Studies have shown that naltrexone has a strong effect on how alcohol works in the brain: reducing the euphoria and cravings. There are also medications that reduce the withdrawals. The point is that the medical community is starting to treat this more as one would other diseases: with a medical approach. Find what is right for you by talking with your doctor, and if you want to give AA or other recovery programs a try, do that. I’ll attach some links which have helped me when I’ve gone researching this topic.




#9

Hey thanks so much for the insight, that really helps and a i think the reality is i am going to have avoid it as much as possible since it has changed from a drug i could take or leave to something i think about in the morning, lucky its early stages so should be able to reign it in. Thanks again :slight_smile:


#10

Thanks also will reply properly when not so drunk…


#11

Hi there. I was diagnosed last year at 26 and looking back, I have definitely attempted to treat my adhd with alcohol. Alcoholism, along with adhd, is in my family history.

I’m not a frequent drinker, but when I did drink, I couldn’t/didn’t want to stop, and would keep going until I blacked out. Then I’d wake up absolutely miserable and feeling guilty. I know I was treating some of my social discomfort and overwhelm from my adhd with drinking. I think it was the mentality of… when you’re drunk, it’s totally fine that your brain is scrambled! Yay! I’m just like everyone else!

I’m not proud of my behavior in those moments. I got a DUI a few years back after a friend, who was my designated driver, got drunk and passed out. Even after this I still didn’t seek help because I didn’t completely accept be blame. I had a really bad night a year ago and came to terms with it.

I stopped drinking for a while and it helped me reevaluate my relationship with alcohol. I do drink now, but only when it’s for the right reasons, when I’m totally comfortable with the people I’m with, and never in party situations.

I’m not sure why your desire for alcohol has increase now, but I know I go through waves of addiction… whether it’s shopping, alcohol, researching, cleaning… could be a number of things. I think it’s my brain’s discontent with my situation. I’m trying to find something fulfilling or exciting and so I get stuck in these things. It’s really frustrating… but huge kudos to you. The best thing I did for myself was admitting the issue so you’re in the right track!


#12

I’m sort of the other way. I used to put away enough booze to re-sink the Titanic. I’d knock off work at 5pm, and me and my mates would be at the Exchange Hotel out the back of Collins St., Melbourne from 5:01pm until we got kicked out. Quite often that was well after the pub had closed. And then I’d get on the tram back home, get off at my stop, and walk 5 meters across the road to the 24 hour pub and drink more. This would happen most nights.

One of the stupidest things I ever heard (I don’t know if it’s true or not) is the saying that “If you think you are an alcoholic, then you probably aren’t”

I thought long and hard about whether I was an alcoholic, and I came to the conclusion that I wasn’t. In the end, I had no problems with not drinking. For decent lengths of time, 6 months or more, my social situation would change, and I’d stop going to the pub. Stopping was never a problem for me, luckily.

These days, I’ve got a cabinet absolutely full of Scotch that I haven’t drunk. I barely touch it now.

But it sounds like you do have a problem. Whether it’s addiction to the alcohol, or just a psychological reaction to life situations is not my call. It’s good that you have a mate who can help.

My problem has always been with the weed. Before dexys, it was the only thing that would slow my brain down enough for me to relax. So I smoked myself stupid for the last 35 years.

Before I got into some safety focussed careers which limited my smoking (random D&A testing in the aviation and mining industries), I would have smoked all day, every day. I lost entire decades to the green haze. In some ways I can function very well on weed. But in other ways, I become a sloppy mess, with all the worst sides of my ADHD coming out.

And I find it VERY hard to stop. I’ve lost my job several times for failing a drug test, but it was only a couple of weeks ago that I decided properly to stop. Not because I want to, but because I have to. And I just want to hit a bong right now…

They say that weed is not addictive. But I definitely find it hard to stop. I’d say I have a psychological dependence rather than an addiction. But knowing I have a cupboard full of weed just a few meters away from me is a real challenge.

I’m hoping that the dexamphetamines will take the place of weed, that I won’t need to have my brain smashed in order to slow the spinning of the wheels. But I still really enjoy the dakka…

Good luck brother!