Books On Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Hello All,
I am an adult 31 years old and have been diagnosed with ADHD specific to impulse and hyperactivity pattern.

I would like to hear from fellow brains about books which teaches us about Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT). Would be great if you could share some info about it.

Thanks

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Welcome to the HowToADHD forums, @Astute!

I don’t have any CBT book recommendations to give, but I found the following recommended by others on the forums previously. There are several CBT books available, but I haven’t read any of them yet.

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This book has a lot of CBT information in it. It’s a bit older and not targeted to ADHD, but it’s an option.

The Feeling Good Handbook” by David Burns

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CBT hasn’t actually ever worked for me. I learned to talk in rather abstruse psychological terms about all the things which I already knew were going on. Through the course of a lot of talk therapy, I developed a new vocabulary for some old experiences, a vocabulary of larger words with higher approval-ratings among psychologists and psychiatrists. But I still can’t function in a day job. No change at all, really. Love school, hate work, can’t stand being a minion near the bottom of the totem pole, can’t understand how people suck it up, come home crying and gnashing my teeth after the first day, getting suicidal by the first week, getting homicidal by the second week. They send me to CBT? I get to say I’m “considering harmful acting out episodes” and “experiencing extreme dysphoria” instead.

So, I personally am trying to take the opposite approach, of reducing the amount of time that I spend in over-analyzing, re-hashing, and re-living some of the past experiences that may have led to my ADHD. I think CBT has a lot of benefits, but after you start to recognize your non-helpful thought-patterns and your potential triggers, sometimes it’s better to not dwell on the negatives. Re-training your brain can be done by NOT running over the same old ruts, over and over. Running over the same old ruts can, in one sense, help you understand and jump out of the rut; but it can also, in another sense, simply dig the rut deeper. I think this other approach is rather a new understanding among caregivers and the psychological community, but it’s helping me, to NOT be fascinated with my own traumas. I suggest Anna Runkle, “The Crappy Childhood Fairy,” on YouTube, for a start on this alternate CBT method.

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I don’t have any experience with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, but I’ve learned a bit about it.

I think that I remember one YouTube video in which Dr. Russell Bradley mentioned that CBT might have potential to help people with ADHD, and another video in which he states that “we know that it doesn’t”. I wish I could remember which videos those were. I think that the first one was from around 2010 (the “maybe it helps” one), and the other from around 2015.

From what I’ve learned, I believe that CBT cannot change who and what you are, it cannot make it so that you have less severe ADHD. However, since many people with ADHD experience other mental health challenges (like I did with anxiety), CBT can help to address those needs by helping you to make changes to how you think and respond to the effects of your ADHD and other life circumstances.

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@j_d_aengus ; @cliftonprince ; @quietlylost
Thanks everyone on the recommendation.
I was recommended by my therapist to study books on ADULT ADHD and BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY. So i was of the opinion that CBT is a good tool.
So what is your opinion… Please throw some light …

Thanks again

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Listening to one of the Dr. Russel videos on youtube he recommended Steven A. Safren.
Investigating a bit about him, I found he created a book to follow during therapy on CBT.
I recently download it for myself and its really good. Its called : mastering your adult ADHD

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My opinion is that CBT and other types of behavioral therapy do help, but that they cannot change a person’s inherent nature. You can learn how to compensate for your ADHD traits, and maybe even use them to your benefit.

I did see a counselor for talk therapy for a few months earlier this year:

  • I think that she used CBT techniques to help me to reframe my struggles and improvements in my current job, and career struggles in recent years.
  • She also helped me realize that the I can compensate for my weaker Executive Functioning Skills (like Task Initiation, Time Management and Organization) by relying more on my strengths (such as Metacognition and Flexibility). I’m adaptable and often very innovative, but have to make a point to ask my colleagues things like “when do you need that done by”, so that I can prioritize what to work on first.

I already knew much of this about myself, but working with a counselor helped me to be aware of how I was working against myself by focussing to much on my shortcomings.


NOTE: There are several different lists of Executive Functioning Skills, from as little as 3 to over 20. The list that my counselor and I used were from the book “The Smart but Scattered Guide to Success”, by Peg Dawson and Richard Guare. They call these the Essential 12 Traits: Response Inhibition, Working Memory, Emotion Control, Task Initiation, Sustained Attention, Planning/Prioritization, Organization, Time Management, Flexibility,Metacognition, Goal-Directed Persistence, & Stress Tolerance.

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My opinion is that CBT can indeed help, but only depending on what you’re trying to help. Some conditions, habits, or disabilities respond well to it, some do not. It probably won’t hurt (though, I hazard, there are some situations which receive so little benefit that the lack of progress might in itself feel like a new hurt, maybe) so it is certainly worth trying. It is a non-invasive procedure, so to speak, and it’s strictly out-patient, so it’s not like you’re getting a limb removed. Try it out, I suggest. But be aware that practitioners aren’t necessarily aware of its weaknesses and pitfalls. It will be up to you to assess whether or not your CBT therapist is actually giving you benefit. He or she will likely expect you to keep coming back because one of the major premises of CBT is that you aren’t ever done with it until you’re done … in other words, there are no clear indicators of success, merely a “you know it when you see it” type feeling to shoot for. You won’t “cure” your ADHD with CBT. But there is still potential benefit. For example, you may learn a large number of excellent in-house coping strategies from CBT (things like, just making up examples, how to not lose your keys by choosing to always hang them on the hook by the door, etc.), and you may also learn from CBT why you had previously resisted or resented engaging in exactly those coping strategies, thus increasing your likelihood of using them better in the future, thus, in turn, positively addressing your ADHD anyway.

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I have also been in behavioral therapy for one year and as far as I can say is that my anxiety has decreased a lot. Still while reading that book, I learned many techniques to help myself everyday with my ADHD. Sometimes it surprises how such a small trick could make you realise that it is actually your ADHD what its making you act like that, and that you could use some tricks to improve it

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I’ve done the past 14-15 months of CBT and DBT(dialectical behavioural therapy) with my psychologist(who also has ADHD). It’s been invaluable in helping me address longstanding anxiety and depression, but mainly through the “homework” my psychologist assigned and my willingness to work hard at it with her.
But the biggest improvement was actually just the ADHD diagnosis with the sudden mind blowing explanation for…just about everything in my life. Oh, and the meds have been manna from heaven.
I’m not so sure if I’d be too keen on reading the academic underpinnings of CBT. It seems more a do or not do scenario.

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Hello Everyone,
Thank you for your opinion.

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@Maria_Ur; @j_d_aengus ; @Pithy.

I am planning to first read this book and understand the technique. Hopefully my therapist will also give some hints in future as i finished just two sessions

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Welcome to the Tribe @Astute

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