Greetings from a monk with ADHD


#41

Thank you SuperDarkFinger!! Know of my prayers for you + :slight_smile:


#42

Yay another chatholic brain! To be honest I actually struggle to understand why God gave me adhd. It’s been such a struggle and some times I feel like he is with me other times I feel he is not. Plus there really isn’t a section of the Bible that deals with adhd it has me kinda lost on a religious aspect. Any thoughts


#43

You know lastminutewonder I use to wonder why too, but if you think about God gave MANY saints ADHD! For example though it wasn’t called ADHD is the mid 1850’s but St. Bernadette Soubirous use to tell her Sisters who taught her “I am stupid sister, I know nothing, and I can’t do anything.” But as her Parish Priest told her “Bernadette you know nothing but understand everything!!” Also St. Faustina back in the 1930’s when she use to get private revelations from Jesus. Her Diary of Divine Mercy she talks about the inner struggle, and in a couple of places writes a long paragraph then the editor will write " unfinished thought." Take courage and look to the cross and be strengthen!! Jesus I Trust in you!! ! chaplet_cover_vimeo_large


#44

Right back at ya, its so nice to be able to chat like this about these sorta things, hope all is well with you over there on the other side of the world and big respect for you doing your thing with such passion :slight_smile: keep it holy bro


#45

There are so many incredible stories that come out of war. The absolute worst depravity, but also the absolute best of humanity as well.

As I read of so many people who pushed themselves so far past physical and mental breaking points to keep going, it humbles me.

For example, on the Kokoda track in New Guinea during WW2, just about every single story from pretty much every single soldier is mind boggling. The guy who had been shot in both legs and I think one arm as well who was asked if he needed a stretcher bearer party to take him back over the incredibly harsh mountains through mud , mosquitoes, dysentery and jungle. He said “I’ll be fine, there are others who need it more than me”. He crawled the entire way back through the jungle. I think it took him 3 weeks. Your story reminded me of that one.

My Grandfather was also in WW1. He was on the losing side, in the Austro-Hungarian army. Joined in 1914, the Austro-Hungarians fired the first shots in the war, against Serbia, and saw some of the harshest fighting (in the frozen Italian mountains, where there was no hiding from the artillery and machine guns unless you were able to dig through solid rock. Or fighting at the Russian front).

He won the second highest medal for gallantry. And as an added bonus, actually survived the whole war.

Unfortunately, I don’t speak Hungarian, so finding out info is difficult. And Grandpa never said a thing about his war service to my Dad. Horrible, horrible memories.

And in WW2 my Dad was tortured by the Gestapo, they broke his spine, had a signed and stamped execution order. But a bomb blew out the back wall of Gestapo HQ, and Dad and 12 of his resistance mates managed to escape and fought Germans from a cave, rescuing Soviet soldiers etc. until the end of the war.

As one of the few Hungarians who stood up against the Germans, after the war he was a local hero. The Russians bought him drinks, and looked after him at first. But then again, the Soviets never truly liked anyone who stood up against the status quo. One of his friends ran to Dad’s house to tell him that the Russians were coming to shoot him, so he left. And that’s why I’m Australian now.

I did some Googling… I’m sure you’ve seen it, but “The Story of the 139th Infantry” could be a good read for you… Might fill in some gaps in my knowledge too. I’m quite unfamiliar with the US involvement in WW1. A few anecdotes, and a bit of “why did it take them so long?”, a few place names (Belleau Wood, Argonne) and that’s about it. I am more familiar with the steady stream of Americans who paid their own passage to Europe well before 1917 and joined other armies to fight. And many other Americans who volunteered in WW2 before the US entered the war. Incredible sacrifices, and crazy bravery.

All the best Brother. Cheers to all those who came before us, and to those who will come after.

Oh, by the way… I was distressed to learn that Benedictine Liqueur was a scam. Not really invented by Benedictine monks at all…


#46

Hello, ADHDMonk! Pleased to meet you! I’m a Catholic as well! I’m something of a convert, seeing as I was raised Christian, but not really Catholic (though we’d visit a Catholic church once in a while) and I ended up becoming Catholic a few years ago! There are struggles for me in the church (like paying attention in Mass, haha) but I’m learning that God knows I have ADHD and that He’d have patience with me, so I need to try and have patience with myself, I think.

And yessssssss, that’s so cool! He seems like an incredible person! And I totally get what you mean about looking up to people of family history! My great-grandfather served in WWII and he’s always been a big hero of mine. From what I’ve heard of him, he’s the sort of person I aspire to be.

And oh my goodness, that’s so sad, @Smoj! I can’t imagine how painful it must have been for them to go through that. T.T


#47

I guess my long winded point is that there were so many remarkable stories to come out of those wars. I’ve only ever seen the tip of the iceberg, and I’ve been into history since I was a kid.

The best and the worst of humanity.


#48

SO TRUE. Even though there’s oftentimes so much cruelty and brutality, there can be so much courage and strength! It takes a lot to fight for something you believe, I think.


#49

Actually Smoj if you flip to page 72 in the book “The story of the 139th Infantry” there is a picture of my great grandfather on page 71 there is a picture of my great grandfather! Actually with your WWII story there is another book called “From Vauquois Hill to Exermont: A History of the Thirty-fifth Division of the United States Army” My great grandfather when he got shot said to one of his men who told him “heading back??” and he said “NO!! It doesn’t amount to anything!!”

Also on a Post WWII note Empress Zita visited our monastery back in the late 40’s. Her cause for canonization for sainthood is up, I have a little devotion to her.


#50

Oh WritingBrain I TOTALLY understand!!! I know Jesus has patience with EVERYONE on this board, no matter an atheist, Christian, or whatever religion. He loves ALL of his children and has total patience. The most important thing is his love for you!! It is real, I have found this out in a special way this past year. Plus as I told Lastminutewonderer all the great saints I believe had ADHD like St. Bernadette who thought she was stupid and good for nothing. But as her parish priest said “Bernadette you know nothing but understand EVERYTHING!” Let us pray for one another… And God bless ALL OF YOU +


#51

I hope