Hello from down under!


#1

Hello everyone!

I’m Ericka from down in Australia. I have been watching the youtube channel for at least a year now but only just came to the forum :slight_smile:

I was diagnosed 2 years ago at 26. I had been treated for depression and anxiety for ~4 years with limited success. One day while talking to my psychologist I stopped mid-sentence because she was giving me the weirdest look. I had been talking about how I’m so exhausted from the energy my brain consumes maintaining this constant tornado of thoughts. I told her I felt like I could see all my thoughts but the minute I tried to grab one, it disappeared like smoke in my hands. So after 2 seconds (or what felt like 3 hours) of awkward silence I asked her if everything was alright. She took another beat then asked me “Have you ever been flagged for ADHD?”. I was shocked. ADHD? Are you insane? I have never been an energetic kid and I have always been cripplingly shy (yes, I too was an ignorant newbie). She asked if I had ever tried cocaine, OK she has clearly lost her mind, but then she explained that she was curious as to me reaction if I had taken cocaine (I haven’t) because if I felt calmer after, she would almost be certain that I had ADHD. She explained a little more, then promptly wrote a referral to a psychiatrist and insisted I make an appointment ASAP.
I went home and immediately did some research (I’m a scientist I can’t help myself). As I read, a throng of pennies started dropping, I was reading my entire life written out as diagnostic criteria and anecdotal stories. My mind was absolutely blown. I called my mum, she had the same reaction as me, I then explain the brief amount I had learnt, and she was also completely stunned.
Anyway, I saw the psychiatrist, we had a long discussion about my childhood (a really uneventful childhood, we were poor but still looked after, no trauma), then I did a few questionnaires (one of which was she told be five objects at the start of the session, then asked me to recall them at the end, truly nasty), and after than one session she was confident to start me on medication immediately. She said she was sure I have ADHD, and my brain’s reaction to stimulants would cement it for her. In Australia, psychiatrists have to apply for a prescribing licence to give you stimulants so after a week waiting for that to go through I took my first Dex.
Well, knock me down and call me Bertha! My brain was calm, my thoughts were coherent, I could stay awake for a whole day. I felt normal. After years of thinking my brain worked just like everyone else’s and it was just me who was failing at wrangling my thoughts (classic shame am i right?) I felt normal for the first time in 26 years.
My diagnosis was towards the end of my last year of my undergraduate degree and since then I have graduated with first class honours and have started my PhD in the microbiology of rabies.
Life is still one hell of a challenge, I still see my psychologist every 2-3 weeks (a different one because I moved city) and we work on cbt and strategies to manage my ADHD. I almost failed my first year review of my PhD, but that was a combination of bad supervisor management and still learning to manage my ADHD. I have inattentive presentation, so I am learning to not take responsibility for everyone’s emotions, and not constantly blame myself for everything. I am also trying hard to step in an wrangle my emotions when they crop up on me unannounced and decide an impromptu dramatic pantomime is in order, particularly my anger and anxiety. One thing I am finding the hardest so far is trying to shed the shame. That has dug it’s roots in very, very deep after decades of being left to grow freely, and it is proving the one hardest to budge.
Anyway, I’ll stop ranting so much, and I look forward to engaging with you all :slight_smile:


#2

Good to see another Aussie in here there are a few of us here.

M


#3

G’day Bertha! :wink:

Yesterday i read something about Australia during a proc-run (because procrastination is a too long of a word. Is it ok to coin terms? :smile:) Can’t for my life remember what it was though. Something about deaths and how the “dangerous ones” aren’t responsible for most deaths.

Anyway, welcome!

(No, I have not gotten my meds yet)


#4

G’day Ericka! I’m another Aussie, in WA.

I’m curious about your experiences with the dexys. I’m on the same.

Do you find that the dexys have altered your handling of emotions? The reason I ask, is that I had a blow out with a co-worker the other week. Not my usual modus operandi. I’d been under a fair bit of pressure and frustration, and then BANG! I just popped my gasket and let it all out. As if all of the defense systems I had in place to self-control the frustrations in my life previously had decided “it’s cool, we’re not needed here” and went around the corner for a smoke.

Before that episode, I had been quite happy with improvements to my emotional dysregulation…

I’ve only been on the meds for a few months now, still trying to work out which is med, and which is me. If that makes sense…

Ha ha… I’m flabbergasted.


#5

Hi @Smoj - early on I was having this happen to me. My Mum, who I would often lose my (mind) temper at, then started to make me flip out worse than ever. I spoke to my psych about it and he gave me an extra half dose at 4/5pm to ease me through until dinner and it has worked well for me.

Part of it might be just the readjustment of your system. For me, having the meds wear off at the time that work finishes, I have a natural energy low and get a bit hangry wasn’t ideal. That extra half tab sorted that out. Then I just had to play with the timing of it for a while so I could also get to sleep that night.

Hope that helps. But know the feeling. It’s kind of scary when you feel anger wearing you and not the other way around. Kind of like throwing three year old tantrums but with access to knives… not how you ever want to feel.


#6
  1. I love how, while I’m reading this, I can freaking HEAR the accent in my head. Also, I love all the different idioms that make no sense to me, but they give me joy!!! :rofl: :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: lol

  2. It’s really awesome how you’re working toward your Ph.D. It seems most adults who get diagnosed already in the deep end, so it’s pretty cool to hear about someone who’s just tried and figured out life on their own.

  3. I just realized I haven’t welcomed you, but instead “talked” your ear off. Sorry 'bout that ‘mate.’ lol, welcome to the party ~fellow brainiac~

  4. Now get ready for the ignorant American dump: What’s it like down under? Do you also live and work in Australia or did you just grow up there? Or maybe did you move to Aussie to work… I know a lot of different countries don’t have the best psych-places, how is it over there? I know in America it’s really hard to travel to different countries, is it the same way for Aussies? How big is your city/town? Is it extremely hot over there or do you get all four seasons? Is ADHD and other mental/neurological disorders talked about a lot? Is there any bad stigma around it or is everyone pretty much chill?

(lol, sorry about that. I’m just a curious child :hugs: You totally don’t have to answer ANY of those questions. )


#7

Hey Smoj,
All in all I’ve been pretty happy with dex, I’m on 10mg twice a day which works well for me, I did try vyvanse but wasn’t a fan. My emotion regulation has definitely improved (I asked my boyfriend if he noticed a difference and he was like…uhhh.yeh…massive, lol) but I do still have a lot of trouble wit my temper. I lose my temper and silly little things, then get mad that I lost my temper at something small, then mad that I’m mad at myself, and down the spiral we go lol. I’m working with my psych to be able to practice noticing it early and take a minute to bring my mind back to the present but it’s super hard. I’m generally pretty good at not blowing up at people but I will occasionally blow up at my boyfriend, which I then instantly feel bad, classic ‘words escape mouth then brain is like WHYYYYYYYYY’ lol
It’s hard work but I see it as a necessity to being happier and more successful in life.


#8

Hey BiTheStarz!

Happy to answer your questions!
-What’s it like down under?
It is actually pretty good in Australia. There are people that complain that we are quickly devolving (=.=’’) but really there isn’t much to complain about. We have availability to free health care, interest free student loans, reasonably priced tertiary degrees, good worker and consumer protections. There are definitely still things to complain about, but overall, it’s pretty great.

-Do you also live and work in Australia or did you just grow up there? Or maybe did you move to Aussie to work
I was born in Aus and I have never left the country :stuck_out_tongue:

  • I know a lot of different countries don’t have the best psych-places, how is it over there?
    It’s…OK. I have heard horror stories from other countries, and it certainly isn’t that here, but it definitely could be a lot better. I live in a capital city, so access to mental health professionals is very easy, but someone in a smaller country town would have some difficulty.

-I know in America it’s really hard to travel to different countries, is it the same way for Aussies?
As I said earlier, I haven’t traveled yet, but as far as I know, there isn’t too much difficulty going to other countries, Aussies are generally accepted everywhere lol. The main difficulty is just how far away we are from everything lol

-How big is your city/town?
I live in Melbourne, which is currently Australias 2nd biggest city, though quickly heading towards first (after Sydney). We have a population of about 4.8million.

  • Is it extremely hot over there or do you get all four seasons?
    Heavily depends on where you are. In Victoria, south of Aus, where I live, we get 4 seasons. If you head more north to Queensland, Northern Territory, or west to Western Australia, they a=only really have hot, and slightly less hot :stuck_out_tongue: (I grew up in Queensland)

-Is ADHD and other mental/neurological disorders talked about a lot? Is there any bad stigma around it or is everyone pretty much chill?
ADHD isn’t talked about a whole lot. I assume we are probably like most other countries with this topic. We have the group of people who think ADHD isn’t real and it’s just a lack of discipline (sigh), the group of people who are ignorant, but not out of malice, and the people who live with it (either themselves or a loved one). I’ve never had a bad experience with a GP not taking it seriously, something I have seen people report happening to them.

B-B-B-B-B-BONUS QUESTIONS!
-I just realized I haven’t welcomed you, but instead “talked” your ear off. Sorry 'bout that ‘mate.’
looks at my original post
looks back at your
lololol

-I love all the different idioms that make no sense to me, but they give me joy!!! :rofl: :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: lol
Let me give you a crash course in speaking aussie :stuck_out_tongue:
-Noone says “throw another shrimp on the barbie”. We call them prawns and we generally eat them cold (cooked but cold), they are a christmas staple, and christmas is really hot lol
-We call mates c***, and C***s mate. We are very liberal with our use of the c-bomb :stuck_out_tongue:
-the more you pay someone out, the better friends you are lol
-No = yeh, nah. Yes = nah, yeh; eg. “Hey mate wanna go down to the pub?”, “Yeh nah, got stuff to do at home”
-we often end descriptors with “as”, eg, If you see something really cool, it would be “cool as.”; if something bad happens, that would be “shit as.” :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

I was prescribed up to 15mg twice a day, but I tend to go 5-10mg three times a day to get me through a 12-14 hour shift.

I’ve found that if I go above 10mg or so, I start to get swampy.

The hair trigger temper thing is something I’ve only noticed creeping up on me in the last few years. Somebody will say something, and then my mouth reacts on autopilot well before my brain has had a chance to engage. If I feel like I’m on the defensive, my comments take the offensive.

Usually it will just be some bad tempered snappy smartarse comment, but the other night when I let go, it was like a bomb going off for about 15 seconds.

I work in mining. You aint seen nothing! I’ve heard people craft entire sentences out of nothing but swearwords, and still be intelligible. I once worked with a guy who was formerly a high school principal. When he first came on site, he was clean and professional. It didn’t take him too long before he was hitting everybody with the F and C bombs as regularly as everybody else.

I find that if the conversation starts heading towards mental health, heavy silence kicks in. When I’ve brought it up myself, nobody wants to talk about it. I think in principle, mental health is supported by many people. But most people find it difficult to engage in the subject, as if by association whatever issues they are dragging around in secret will be let out of the bag if they open their mouths.

On the whole, things are improving by millimeters per decade, but there is a long, long way to go still.

I lived in Melbourne for 7 years, mainly in Richmond. The food and the pubs are awesome! But the weather… If you haven’t got Seasonal Affective Disorder from living in Victoria, you’re doing well!

We actually get more rainfall per annum in Perth than you get in Melbourne. But in Melbourne, you get that steady, thin drizzle that carries on into Spring and Summer.

My mate gave me the best advice when I arrived in Melbourne. He said “It doesn’t matter how beautiful and sunny it looks outside, always carry a jacket anyway”. Good advice.

On the other hand, Perth is just an oversized country town with too many cashed up bogans in it. And some of the most stunning beaches in the world.

I wasn’t aware of that. Is it a Trump thing? It used to be really easy for Americans to travel, one of the hardest criticisms of the Communist countries during the cold war was that they were not allowed to leave, in order to not be subjected to ideas that were incompatible with Communism. Is this how it’s going in America now? That’s pretty sad…

For the rest of the world, it’s usually just a matter of spending a few hundred bucks on a flight, getting on it, and getting off in whatever country. Visas are usually easy. 90% of the time you just rock up to the arrival airport, get a stamp, and just walk on through.

Give it a try. As an educated, intelligent woman, you owe it to yourself to get sunburned while hungover on a beach in Bali as you are getting your hair braided into cornrows while wearing a Bali Bintang tank top which you paid $120 for because you couldn’t remember if it was 100 rupiahs to the dollar or 10,000.

On the other hand, I can totally recommend Cambodia or Vietnam if you’d like something else a little less pub-crawley. Even Bali can be great once you get away from Kuta, Legian and Seminyak. Ubud is still nice, and the north coast is like the rest of Bali was 30 years ago.

Anyway, on yer bike and get out there.


#10

omg, I low key didn’t expect you to actually answer lol. (especially so quickly, like daaaaaamn.) But this is really cool!
I heard that Australia, despite the distance, is a lot like America. And that the countries are really close allies and brothers in arms lol. I’m a bit of a history nerd soooo.

-The bottom part is a bit confusing, but with how crazy idioms get in different cultures I guess it would be nearly impossible to explain them over one post.

  • like with the “cool as,” do you just leave it as that or actually compare it. Like I might say, “that’s cool as shit!” (which would mean it’s really cool) but would you just leave it as, “that’s cool as.”
  • W. T. F. is “throw another shrimp on the barbie,” like where did that come from??? (also I usually eat shrimp cold too, but I eat it on new years, cuz it’s a family tradition, or at a chinese buffet.)
  • So is the c***/mate thing like the irish thing? Where some curse words are just playful and part of everyday conversation and others are actual swear words? And then there’s different words for calling someone stupid that aren’t curse words like “Idjit.”

-The season thing we have here too. well, I mean how it depends where you live. I live in Minnesota, which is very, VERY north, but it’s also in the middle of the continent so we get super extreme weather. From tornados to blizzards to 90 degree summers! But somewhere like, idk arizona maybe (?), it’s more just hot and less hot.

  • THERE’S 4.8 MiLlIoN people in one city?! Or is that the whole country? The town I grew up (and currently live) in only has about 16 thousand… Of course it’s more of a large town than an actual city, but still! M I L L I O N S
    mind stops processing all data

#11

nonononononono, our country isn’t on a lock down lol. It’s not that we aren’t ALLOWED to leave, it’s just HARD and kinda complicated. There’s actually a lot of factors that go into why Americans don’t/can’t travel. And this isn’t a Trump thing either, it’s actually been going on for a while!

  1. {Money} I’ve never been on a plane, but I’m gonna go out on a limb and say (for us) it’s a little more than a few hundred. Remember, America is a HUGE country. Some people take planes just to get from one side to the other. Traveling is expensive (Plus there’s the hotel, transferring money from dollars to euro or whatever money the country uses, spending money for different trinkets, food money, etc).
  2. {Time} I don’t know what Aussies get for time off, but we get jackshit. Depending on the job, you might only have a handful of paid days off (even if you’re a new mom!). It’s hard to schedule a weekend, let alone a decent amount of time that’s worth going to a different country.
  3. {Opportunity} Other than study abroad programs and other thing like that, it’s hard to find a decent CHANCE to travel (because lord forgive you just WANT to do something!). Americans, despite popular belief, actual try to get things done. Constantly. There’s such a pressure to be productive (especially ADHDers who want to do EVERYTHING and than never do any of it). Not to mention, if you don’t have family or international friend in [insert country] it’s much harder to get around. Traveling alone is HARD and terrifying.
  4. {F*ck security} Passports, luggage check, your birth certificate or ID, and the blood of your first born child to get past the first gate. Jk, but honestly it’s pain. The waiting and people rummaging through your stuff? No thanks! Ever since 9/11, it’s nearly impossible to even get to CANADA!! Canada is a 6 hour drive for me, and it’d probably take an extra hour to get to the other side. Canadian culture and Minnesotan culture is SO similar, it’s an on running joke that MN is the “Canada of America.” Which brings me to #4
  5. {Worth it?} Sounds horrible, but hear me out. The closest countries are Canada and Mexico. (and depending on where you live the culture will either be night or day from your own.) With the money, time, security, and my next one DISTANCE- traveling the world doesn’t seem so worth it anymore! Spend thousands of dollars for a weekend in a country (where you might not understand the language!) and take hours both of that weekend just to GET THERE.
  6. {Distance} America is huge. Every state has its own sub-culture and are bigger than most European countries. I’ve only been to a few states and there’s so much of my own country I haven’t seen. Never been outside of the area!! Like I said, closest countries are Canada and Mexico and from where I’m sitting Mexico (or any of the other S. American countries) is a hell of a drive! Then there’s the rest of the world- which is at least one ocean away in every direction!!! It’s hard to be so far from home, and when Americans go to a fast food restaurant to eat something familiar, it’s vaguely uncomfortable.
    Americans are the butt of the culture joke. It’s true we might not be as exposed to different cultures, but that’s because we don’t travel as much. It’s harder to travel, because most other countries are smaller and closer together. But when Americans DO travel, they aren’t always treated the best. Or we make a fool of ourselves because a lot of culture stuff from other countries is so new. . .

Sorry for going on a huge rant. I just get a l i t t l e heated about this subject.


#12

Great explanations ErickaT and funny to boot. Welcome and Merry Christmas.

I’m also Victorian. Have lived in Melbs on and off but am in the country.

Do you have both Pav and Choc Ripple cake for Christmas? I recently found out in Qld they don’t make choc ripple cake. I thought it was a national thing bu no.

@Smoj - is choc ripple cake a staple in Perth?

Hope you both have a Merry christmas. :christmas_tree:


#13

We had pav in QLD (I’ve only been in Melb for about 2 years.) Choc ripple not so much. I’ve heard of it but not a go to in QLD


#14

Interesting take on travel, you covered many of the things I think about. I do want to travel but it is one of those overwhelming things.
To add to some things:
-{Distance} America is huge. Every state has its own sub-culture and are bigger than most European countries
Australia is the same, fairly comparable in size to the USA, though the USA has a lot more towns that Australia. It’s totally normal for us to have hours driving time between small towns, plus most of our country is desert.

-I don’t know what Aussies get for time off, but we get jackshit. Depending on the job, you might only have a handful of paid days off
With full time work, we are mandated to get 4 weeks paid leave every year, it’s pretty great.

-Traveling alone is HARD and terrifying.
Amen! There is no way I would travel alone. I wouldn’t get past the airport before I was a non-functioning puddle of anxiety lol!

    • like with the “cool as,” do you just leave it as that or actually compare it. Like I might say, “that’s cool as shit!” (which would mean it’s really cool) but would you just leave it as, “that’s cool as.”
      No we just leave it at “cool as” we are far too lazy to finish our sentences :stuck_out_tongue:
    • So is the c***/mate thing like the irish thing? Where some curse words are just playful and part of everyday conversation and others are actual swear words? And then there’s different words for calling someone stupid that aren’t curse words like “Idjit.”
      Yes exactly like the irish thing. Seeing as we were the dumping ground for UK criminals, we get a lot of our idioms from them

-I heard that Australia, despite the distance, is a lot like America. And that the countries are really close allies and brothers in arms lol. I’m a bit of a history nerd soooo.
We are weird love child of the Uk and the USA :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

I have vaguely heard of Choc Ripple Cake, but I don’t go out of my way for cake usually.

My mate introduced me to a winter Melbourne delicacy, Sticky Date Pudding… We don’t see that much in Perth.


#16

Hey Aaron. Interesting post… I’ve got friends who tell me the exact same things here.

I guess I’m a bit travel jaded, and forget that I’m in an unusual position, so I meant no offense.

For my work, I travel by jet. Then I do around 180-190 hours of work over 14 days and fly back home. My previous job was in aviation, so flying was also par for the course.

I grew up around aircraft, both my parents have been pilots, and my first international flight was at around 1 year old in a single engined light plane my Dad flew Mum, me and two Grandparents to Kathmandu from South Australia.

I love travelling, and can’t get enough of it. I speak around four languages, and love learning more about places I’ve never been.

Funnily, many of the points you raise against travelling are things I would say are the best things about it.


#17

Actually, I’ll hit them one by one…

Fair call. Money is always a problem. Although when I was in the US back in the late 80s, I was surprised at how cheap airfares were. Flights in Australia were much more expensive back then. Now they are cheaper than they were. I bought an air ticket from NY to Chicago because it was actually cheaper than taking the bus.

Another fair call. There is never enough time. As I mentioned, my job is odd. I work 14 days, and then get 6 days off. So time is on my side. I’m a contractor though, so if I’m not working I don’t get paid.

Not sure I get that one… Many times while travelling, I’ve stumbled across some amazing opportunities. Too many to pick up on all of them.

Pressure to be productive is definitely a valid thing. But you wouldn’t feel much of it sitting at a beach bar in Costa Rica.

Traveling alone is one of the best things you can do. You are never alone for long unless you want to be, and it’s much easier to focus on your surroundings when you’re by yourself. It’s really not hard, but I’m sure it can be terrifying if you’ve never done it.

In the end, an airport arrivals hall, walk to a cab rank, dodgey over-priced cab ride to a hotel or backpacker’s through streets full of weirdos is pretty much exactly the same if you’re doing it in New York, New Zealand or New Guinea. Actually, New Guinea can get quite weird…

I’ve never been to a country that didn’t have Nescafe, Marlboros, Coke, an Irish pub, and rarely where there wasn’t a McDonalds in most cities.

I can’t get too fired up about this one. It’s a drag, but it’s not the end of the world. All the waiting around, bloody pedestrians, expensive food and drinks… Not my favourite. But it’s the price to pay.

Some airports I actually look forward to. Singapore airport is amazing. Koh Sammui airport in Thailand is lovely. Charles De Gaulle in Paris is like somebody twisting your brain around…

I get the bomb swab all the time. I once lost a bottle of duty free wine I’d bought on one plane to airport security on another plane which bugged me at the time. The X-ray machine is a hassle. I just stick all the loose stuff from my pockets into my jacket or carry on bag, don’t wear a belt, take out my laptop, done.

Apart from that, airport security have generally been pretty mild. I’ve never copped a full-body-cavity-search, nor do I even know anybody who has.

Canada is great. Beautiful place, great people, William Shatner. I’d like to go back and see it properly. Australian 10c pieces are exactly the same size as Canadian 25c pieces. You can make out like a bandit on public transport! (For the Aussies…)

Mexico I can’t say. I’d go in a heartbeat, but it’s so far from here. I have spent a fair bit of time in South America, but never north of Venezuela (up to Florida).

I’ve seen Minnesota winter. Words can’t describe how cold that was for me… An unheated share house in Dinkytown…

Knocking over some unpronounceable green cocktail with an umbrella in it on a beach in Mexico instead? Very, very rare to get frostbite in Mexico. And it would be heaps cheaper than at home if you could get it.

Even Hawaii… It’s the same country, same language, money etc. But it’s largely a different culture.

Yes it is. There’s plenty to see, and there’s no way that you could see it all in one lifetime. I was there for around 3-4 months, and I only barely scratched the surface. But I’m glad I did. I had some great times with some unbelievably awesome people, and saw some amazing stuff.

Australia is about the same size as the mainland USA. I’m lucky enough to have lived in almost every state, and I’ve seen a fair bit of it. There’s so much more to see, and so many places to go back to.

I know plenty of people who say the same thing: “Why would I travel overseas when there’s so much to see at home?”.

And there is a bit of sh!t Americans have to eat when they travel (Aussies have a little bit of a similar name in certain parts of the world).

There’s a part of that which sticks to anybody travelling. Nobody much likes tourists, unless it’s to sell them something or fleece them. It’s the same anywhere in the world. Tourists are kind of low on the social order, and can be seen as a hassle for people who deal with lots of them.

Two things that can help: Buy some cheap clothes at a local shop. Try to look like a local. Difficult if everybody is Asian for example, and you are Caucasian. Or if everybody is suntanned and you are not. But you can at least look a bit more like you’re familiar with your suroundings. Walking around with a giant camera around your neck, a map, and a big sign hanging off you saying “I’m A Tourist: Pick Me!” won’t do you any favours.

The other thing that can help: Get away from the tourist areas. If you see a restaurant that has only local people, no tourists, go there. You’ll be less likely to find English speakers, but then people won’t be used to tourists and will make more of an effort to be friendly and helpful. It’s a great way to meet local people and have a good time.

Loads of Americans I’ve met love traveling, and seeing the world. Then they also love going home again as well.

I’ll see your huge rant, and raise you a giant diatribe. Sorry, got carried away.

I get fired up about traveling too. :grinning: Hey if you’d prefer to stay at home with a log fire and a loved one than stand in lines at airports to catch some weird new flu, it’s all fine by me.

It’s just that everyone I know who has said similar things and then ended up overseas anyway… They all loved it and went travel crazy.

Happy Christmas all!


#18

It’s great all the aus people, but do we have anyone from NZ here?


#19

Also just seen in the comment above the line “Sorry, got carried away” i think that should be official adhd language :slight_smile:


#20

I’m in the unique position that when my parents divorced they ended up in different states on opposite sides of the country, 1500 miles apart. So I flew down to see my father once a month, every month, from the age of 8 to 18. I got to be a pretty professional traveler, so travelling alone doesn’t phase me in the least. It got a little more anxiety causing after 9-11, mostly with all the security checkpoint rules and the fear of leaving my ID behind.