How did you know have ADHD

I am British. I had a nervous breakdown. I realised that I did not have a focused mind. A mental health worker told my GP surgery, to meet. A GP told me, I have symptoms of ADHD. It made sense. It is an accident, I found out about ADHD, just like I found out dyspraxia (in depth), aspergers traits.

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I had suspicions at times in the past but didn’t know until I was officially diagnosed after working with my therapist and med provider for over a year. I was still having lots of struggles with attention even after being stable on medicine and having neuropsychological testing. Once the diagnosis was made, however, it opened a whole new world.

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whats aspergers traits?

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Isn’t aspergers best if its traits are lightly boiled and topped with some butter, maybe as a side dish for a poached fish? Oh no wait, that’s ASPARAGUS.

Asperger’s Syndrome is a well-documented mental condition, and it has a lot of connections with ADHD. You can Google the term “Asperger’s Syndrome” for much more information. I’m sure the original poster in this thread meant, by saying “aspergers traits,” that he personally had some traits that stem from having the syndrome.

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I have borderline asperger syndrome. My condition, is on the Autistic Spectrum, but it is not severe enough to have a diagnosis of asperger syndrome, because I do not have the full traits. I have aspergers traits because of social communication. The number of traits, is slightly more than a person not on the Autistic Spectrum. Borderline asperger syndrome, is associated with ADHD/ and or dyspraxia.

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I’m 50 years old and only just diagnosed with ADHD.
I suffered from depressions, anxiety and burnouts during my life. Always searched for professional help and was always diagnosed with one of the above.
Until now. I’m suffering from a burnout again and saw a new therapist. He immediately asked if someone ever told me I had ADHD. No never. (I did once mention it myself as a question, to a psychiatrist, but he said:‘neh, don’t think so’).
so I went through the testing procedure. And there it was. I was the perfect example with all boxes checked. Lucky me. :thinking:
I was misdiagnosed for about 30 years (over and over).
Now I can finally start working on myself and write my own manual on how to handle ADHD and start to prevent depressions, anxiety and burnouts by working on the front end of who I am instead of pushing down the symptoms over and over again.

@JessicMcCabe maybe you could make a video about ADHD and burnout. It seems that Brains are suffering more from burnout then others do. Like to know more about that.

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I can relate to much of your story. I’ve wondered at times now that I have the ADHD diagnosis if I was “misdiagnosed” in the past, but for me I feel it was more being “underdiagnosed.” I still feel the mood disorder is true for me, in addition to the ADHD. Treating both has been wonderful.

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Oh, this sounds so familiar! Except, in my case, I wasn’t misdiagnosed but rather mis-not-diagnosed. (Misdismissed? I don’t know if this is accurate but I really want misdismissed to be a word just for the sound of it!)

I grew up in a middle-class family that firmly treated mental health as a non-topic - as something that happened to other people. So it was a question that never came up and even if I thought of it, I either did so jokingly or in the sense of “is everybody weird but me?”*, or I dismissed it immediately. (See what I did there?)

Actually, this is true for any kind of abnormality: At age thirty, I went to an eye doctor because I sometimes had trouble seeing clearly, especially in twilight and after long computer sessions. He told me that not only did I need glasses but that my left eye had never learned to see fully in the first place. But I’d grown up without glasses, so the tought that I might need them had never occurred to me until then.

Same for mental health. Who, me?

My complete inability to latch on to the grown-up life train that everybody else was getting on (including magically launching careers and such) should have been a hint, as well as the fact that I never learned to internalize social skills. Both of these led to anxieties and an almost-burnout from trying too many things at once to get settled.

I learned about Asperger’s around then and recognized a lot of the traits, so I checked it out out of curiosity and because I slowly started to suspect that there might be a pattern behind all of those gaps in my grown-up-ness. But the online tests I did to test the waters were inconclusive. My ADD flatmate told me about ADD having similar traits, so I tested for that and read about it and watched tons of How to ADHD videos. Then finally I got an appointment for a diagnosis.

All of this took some time, though. Five years between the burnout and the diagnosis, mostly held up by my own dismissal, doubts that I might just be some lazy dude looking for an easy explanation, other doubts that if I was ADHD at all, I was probably one of the lighter cases and shouldn’t clog up the medical system like that, as well as virtually everybody else I knew telling me that I can’t be ADHD and if I were, they’d have to be, too (I’m pretty sure some of them were spot-on without knowing it, but that’s a rant for another day) and I should just get a job or a girl-friend or possibly both, depending on who was talking. Also, some advice on dropping some of my responsibilities, but never the ones they relied on. But that, too, is a rant for another day.

So maybe I was misdiagnosed, mostly by myself. If “you’re totally fine but you need to get more stuff done” counts as a diagnosis. I’m not sure there was ever a point at which I 'knew* I had ADHD. It was more like a process of eliminating the alternatives, including (actually beginning with) the possibility that “it’s nothing”.

*) I still think that.

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hey,
im from kuwait and i’m 27 yrs o. recently i was diagnosed with adhd! and im having a struggle believing that i have it! even though i have most of the symptoms. my therapist and my psychiatrist are positive that i have it. its just that one doctor that i ve been to he said that i’m lazy and bad at school and its ok to suck at something you dont have to be perfect.

tomorrow i’m getting my meds for the first time. but im anxious and i feel maybe that doctor was right and i dont have adhd maybe i’m not good at school and i really cant help with my neg thoughts.

so i was wondering how do you really know that you have adhd. how did you prove it and is there a way to prove that we’re adhd positive other than the known symptoms.

i’m also frustrated and i dont know how it will feel when taking meds. i’m afraid that it ‘ll affect me negatively. or i wont be me any more. i live 27 years thing that all the acts and what ever i’m going through is part of my personality its kinda weird to change it now.

i would love to here about your experiences because i have no one with adhd to talk to and its really hard to relate.

thank you.

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There are various ways to help validate an ADHD diagnosis, but it’s hard to “prove” it at times because it matters so much on history and varies so much by person. That being said, I’d wonder, who are you trying to “prove” it to? Yourself? What makes you doubt the diagnosis? Do you have fears of it being true? Or do you have fears of the diagnosis being taken away?

Often times we second guess things like the diagnosis because we have judgments in our head that feed doubt and insecurity.

As far as meds, be patient and also keep track of how you feel. Maybe journal a bit each day as to how you feel or what effects you’re noticing (good or bad). Make sure you’re consistent with your medication and communicating closely with your doctor. Don’t expect the medication to do everything. Medication works for most people with ADHD but not everyone. And not everyone finds the right medication the first time. Sometimes there’s a trial and error process.

Whatever happens, good luck!

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@Memi

Can I email you ? What is your email address ?

I speak arabic well !!!

Your English is good !!

I am of Iraqi descent.

It is much harder in the Middle East with ADHD because of a lack of support, services and understanding. Kuwait is better than Iraq !!!

The report will detail, how severe the condition, the impact, the tests with quantitative data and analyse of information, findings, which has to meet a certain criteria. The doctor will know his information, because he knows about ADHD, he/she will have seen other patients with ADHD.

I will put my email for a few hours.

Good luck

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First time: Overwhelm and mood swings:
Delusionaly cheerful one minute,
screaming like a deranged drill sergeant the next.

Second time, ten years later: see ‘first time’

Luckily I can 1. get help locally 2. and globally, right here

ps. hope everyone is keeping safe, or careful or both.

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For me, I don’t feel I was ever mis-diagnosed previously, because I never had any other previous diagnosis. I did very well in school, and was always a “proper” or “good kid” type, so people who don’t know anything about ADHD would readily assume that I couldn’t possibly have some condition in which you lack attention. But once out of school I learned that workplaces just utterly destroy me. So when it got to the point of going to a cubicle, I discovered an inability, bad enough that I wandered through life not knowing that I should be trying to find a solution. When I finally did get a diagnosis, it fit like a glove but was so late in my life (43 years old) that it wasn’t really in place to aid much in any of my development. I really can’t say I was “mis-diagnosed”, therefore, on the subject of my ADHD traits and characteristics. I was “un-diagnosed” for a long time.

On the idea of childhood trauma, I sometimes think I am mis-diagnosed or have a mis-directed treatment. I take the inventories and questionnaires and think, “but isn’t everybody like that?” And for some of the questions, the answer is “yes, everybody is like that, the question is dumb and you shouldn’t put too much emphasis on it” (f.e., “Do you sometimes dislike criticism and feel that people don’t understand you?” duh … we ALL should answer “yes,” depending on the definition of “sometimes” in that question!). But other questions really hit home for me, and I go, “wow! I didn’t know that wasn’t supposed to happen!” (f.e., “Did a parent make a regular practice of calling out your errors only after groups of your peers had arrived to observe your humiliation?” and I realized, “oh, most parents would make sure to criticize their children when nobody was looking? I didn’t know? I thought my mom’s usual tactic, of waiting until we were all together in carpool, all the kids waiting in the same automobile, and then telling me what a mistake I made yesterday with … whatever household chore or schoolwork or how I treated a relative or whatever … I thought every parent did that to their children!”) So I have a sense of “mis-diagnosed” about childhood neglect, abuse, humiliation, because it can present in so many ways and can be so much of a surprise to me to even learn that I am candidate for having it.

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Thank you so much, your words really helped ! i’m grateful for you guys🙏🏻

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@Memi

Salam Aleikum Memi, Marhaba !!

Kayf Halik !!!

Ana min 'asl earaqiin !!

You can become a patreon, only $10, see you in the discord, howtochat room, We can chat, I am of Iraqi descent.

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@Memi

Salam Aleikum Memi, Marhaba !!

Kayf Halik !!!

Ana min 'asl earaqiin !!

I can speak arabic !!!

ana 'atahadath alearabia

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I hate tests with questions like that. For one, your point about “sometimes” is spot-on. How about “NO” because one always has it? Stupid.

Also, those are two questions. And I know you made this one up to make your point but I’ve seen quite a few questionnaires that seriously mangled two traits into one question and I go, uh, yes on the first part and no on the second? Where’s my checkbox?

Or questions like “Do you often feel left out because people don’t understand you?”. Yeah, but what if I like it that way?

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It’s never too late . . . :sunglasses:

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I was first diagnosed as a child and then reaffirmed as a teenager. I have had providers tell me there’s no way I have it, it’s just anxiety, or I’ve grown out of it. I doubted for a long time. But the more I read and explore about ADHD, the more I hear other people’s stories, the more I realize how much it fits. I feel validated.

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