I need Employment Help

Hello I am new to this board. When I heard Jessica’s Ted talk it brought me to tears because someone else was telling my story. I can’t seem to find a job and the jobs that I do get fire me after a year.

In 2012 I graduated college with a 3.0 gpa in communications. I applied to several marketing ferns and never got hired because I didn’t have experience. In 2015-2017 I worked for a local electronic store when that went under. I then thought that I would get into software development. I attended a coding bootcamp where they promised to place with an internship after I completed it but it went under 2 days after my graduation so I was on my own.

I attended all the meetups, hackathons, job clubs, job fairs, conferences that I could but nothing came from it. The reason was that I didn’t have the experience. I got rejected because I didn’t know C#, or some other piece of tech. I then applied to Dev ops and testing I got rejected there too, again because I didn’t know their stack. I met people at meetups and hackathons that said they would help me but after a week never heard from them. I have even tried calling businesses because one of the recruiters suggested it, and was told to apply online. The times I do apply online I hear nothing back.

Am I destined to live in poverty?

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First of all welcome to the community it’s nice to see that you’re getting to know a big part of yourself!! And no you are not destined to be in poverty. In fact there’s not really a destiny but that’s besides the point… It sounds like you have struggled deeply in finding a job and not only has adhd brought you bad fortune but also other factors. But instead of focusing on the things you cannot control I think maybe we should look at the things you can. And you have already taken the first step in trying to fix your problem which is a really good and healthy way of doing things!! I see that you’re probably really passionate about this field and that you won’t be given up anytime soon. I may not be able to fix or give you advice on how to get a job. But I’ll give you some advice and a little summary about the video I’m gonna enter. You may have seen it but it’s good to have a little refresher… Look up Wall off of Awful ADHD youll find two videos I hope it helps. It may not be exact situation but I’m not sure so take a peek if you will…

It talks about the different ways we should react to things. PS stay safe​:heart::heart:

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@nogoodname. Do you still live near your college alma mater? Check with their alumni center to see if they have placement services with which they can assist you. Make sure they know you’ve added the coding skills to your degree. Other than that, broaden your search criteria. I’m assuming you are already using something like Monster, DICE or LinkedIn. A lot of large companies (at least here in the US) look for someone they can bring in at a job like Help Desk and promote into other areas once they know the organization and have proven their work ethic.

Also, what do you really want to do? What is your passion?

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@MegaProcrastinator you have some great points. I am currently working with my alumni for help at getting employment. My college doesn’t place people into jobs. I do apply online but just applying online gives you a 10% chance of success. Thats the main reason why when I call into the company and they tell me to apply online I get frustrated. I know that they say “they review them” but they never get back with me. Junior developers, dev ops, and testing are all entry-level positions.

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BTW, if you happen to be in the northern Denver area, I could put you in touch with the company I work for. I don’t really have contacts anywhere else.

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@MegaProcrastinator Thank you so much. I live in ohio but am willing to relocate.

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Denver is an expensive cost of living area for an entry job. Actually, it is Greeley about an hour north of Denver. But if you want to check it out, look at https://jobs.jbssa.com/. We have plant facilities all over the country, but the IT positions you mentioned would be in the corporate office.

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@nogoodname, welcome to the community!

Some suggestions (you may have already done some of this but just in case):

  • Create a linkedin page if you haven’t already and then create a resume there with your education, experience, your skills, your goals etc. Make connections with the people you know. The more people the better.
  • Find some open source project where you have interest and can contribute. You can then point to any substantial contribution in your resume. It is also a good way to know other hackers.
  • Join Github – you will probably need this if you work on any open source projects. Also if you work on anything on your own time that others may find useful, put it up there. If you think of something useful, go set up a service on AWS – also a good way to learn Javascript.
  • If you meet people at meetups/hackathons, do get their email address and don’t be afraid of contacting them if they don’t contact you. Find a way to stay in touch. One good way is to ask their advice! Generally speaking people like being asked their opinion and giving advice + you may find a genuine mentor this way.
  • In general, always follow up. If you talk to a company and they say send a resume, followup a few days later and ask them.
  • If you like writing and have interesting things to say, start a blog. The name of the game is to be known!
  • Read techie magazines or websites to keep track of what is currently in demand and upcoming new things. If interesting, you can do a bit of googling and some research to learn about such things.
  • A friend always recommends the book “What color is your parachute” to people looking for a job or changing a job. I haven’t actually read it so can’t tell you more but I have heard good things about it from others so you may wish to check it out.
  • If you find a sympathetic & sensible person who has some job experience, try to do some mock interviews so that they can give you feedback on how to improve your performance in a phone or real interview.

Best of luck!

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Hello @nogoodname you seem to be caught up in the loop. I can’t offer you any advice about the tech job market. I do know that competition for jobs is fierce at the moment. Try not to take rejection too personally, I know it’s hard but I’m afraid no feedback seems to be the modern way of doing things.

Have you considered looking at different trades, being an electrician for example, or something similar. It is still a constantly developing skill set, there is so much new tech coming into new products now, you could still find it mentally stimulating, and possibly easier to pick up than someone with a less tech minded background. Maybe I’m way off the mark with this suggestion, but a trade like this will always be in demand.

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Thank you for all the responses. You all have great ideas. I feel that part of why I struggle with finding a job is the social aspect of it. Most people get jobs from the connections they make. I struggle with that. I struggle with making connections with people whom might be able to help me and following up.

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I understand. I am also an immigrant and I don’t speak the language well, and everyone here hires based off of personality. I am an American who gets told a lot that “I hate /won’t hire Americans” and IF they give me a chance, then my disorder kicks into overdrive and I get let go. I am having to think very outside of the box at the moment. My partner knows my weaknesses and strengths, and has joked about businesses he could start with me as an employee. So, thinking backwards about hiring me, from a business owner perspective. If you know someone who owns a business in your area of interest, maybe you can brainstorm with them. And be reeeeaaaaalllly honest about the stuff that you should not do. ( example: I will never waitress again. I lose my temper with jerks.) Good luck, I will follow this forum for tips and advice for myself also. :crossed_fingers::peace_symbol: