Need help. Might have ADHD?

Hello hello. I’m Ally, an 18 year old college student. I’m like 87.3% sure I have ADHD, but I’m too scared to ask my parents.
Back in elementary school, I was having some problems in the classroom and at home. I couldn’t concentrate, was totally disorganized, rarely turned in assignments on time, and just generally couldn’t sit still for more than short bursts without squirming. In middle school, after these problems had persisted for a multitude of years my mom decided to get me checked out by a psychologist (or a psychiatrist I can’t remember the difference. I think one of them can prescribe medication? Or maybe do something with clients that the other can’t? I forgot.) and I was able to get more support after that like a seat up in the front and some extra time to turn in homework. Problem is, I’m in college now, having the same problems. . . And I can’t remember what exactly was my issue.
My mom would know, but I’m scared to ask her. What if there isn’t anything up with me other than the fact that I’m just lazy? What if she tells me that everything that I think is wrong and I’m just not “applying myself”?
I know what I gotta do, but I just wanted to get it off of my chest to people who haven’t met me and aren’t close friends/relatives.
Thank you and goodnight.

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Hey! I know you don’t want to ask your mum but it seems like you need to know? You don’t have to tell her you think you have ADHD at first you could just tell her you have a memory of getting help as a child but don’t remember what it was for etc. Basically just asking her to fill in the blanks. This will also let you know what she thinks about it, so if she’s remembering it badly- probably safe to assume she won’t support you loads now but if she’s remembering it because it helped you and she was happy with that then you know you can probably go ahead and start telling her you think you have ADHD.

Even if you don’t have ADHD, you wouldn’t be lazy, lazy is just a cover up for something either about you or your environment that needs to change x

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My son was diagnosed at age 4. He’s now 42. Without the help he received, special tutoring to help learn, in his own way how to read; Stimulant medication - Ritalin; and ADHD coaching; then he most likely would have not gone to college at all. As a child he struggled with all sorts of ADHD symptoms and when he could not master an age-appropriate skill (e.g. bike riding) he would call himself “Stupid”.

He dropped out of 2 colleges and finally graduated from an engineering school and works as an electrical engineer.

I am forever grateful to my wife for convincing me to have our son evaluated for ADHD. I shudder to think how things might have otherwise worked out for my son.

I too have ADHD, which I did not get diagnosed until I was 50+ years old. I was relieved to find out that there was a reason why I had struggled throughout school. Eventually I graduated with a Masters degree in Social Work. And even then I would think of myself as a “fraud”. In other words, I really did not deserve to graduate because somehow I “fooled” all of my professors . . . And I was not really “that smart”! ADHD can do a hell of a lot of damage to one’s self-confidence / self-esteem . . . especially when not diagnosed and managed appropriately.

You struggled earlier in life. Your mother lived that experience as did you. I think she would not be surprised if you raised your questions now. Wouldn’t it be better to talk with her and get the help you need to ensure a rich and successful life-experience?

Best of luck to you.

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Sounds like you could use some accommodations and asking about previous accommodations might be a good first step.

But some people don’t have the kind of relationship with their parents that makes that discussion possible or advisable and they can still get help. There should be some kind of student services office at your college that can point you in the right direction, regardless of whether or not you will be bringing the extra information from your mom.

You also don’t need to wait until you’ve talked to her to get the ball rolling. It could be that after a first meeting with a counsellor you will have a better idea of whether or not you want to discuss it with her and if so, what you want to get out of it. The two discussions can run parallel.

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Due to being 18 years of age and Please correct me if I am incorrect in this is untrue for where you are living but here in America if you want accommodations and get them from a university you can make the decision and your parents do not have to be involved in the process the law protects you. I also think that this article from understood.org may help https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/choosing-starting-school/leaving-high-school/7-things-to-know-about-college-disability-services
Also, the level of support varies from student to student but I will also say that the quality of support varies from college to college. Some colleges are specific towards one disability group and can have extent support services for that particular group but they still have to provide support for other students who may not be apart of that group but still have disabilities that need support. Also good luck with your journey

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