Psychiatrists and therapists/counselors

Howdy, brains (I really do feel like a zombie typing that - as Jessica mentioned in a vid - but at least I don’t drool when I type it…I mean, not much)!

I hope y’all are well.

I have had a combo psychiatrist/therapist team working with me since I started this journey 6 yrs ago. It seems to have been quite helpful, though my relationship with them and what I gain from them has changed slightly since I moved and had to change both.

Pre-move:
My psychiatrist was (I’m sure she still is) such a bad-ass. She would spend 45 min sessions with me, working with the issues I was going through, helping me therapeutically in person, and then helping me with meds-wrangling.

My therapist was helpful for weekly visits for more day-to-day work. They helped me a great deal and complimented the work I was doing with my psych.

Post-move/now:
My psych only works with me regarding my meds (in fact, when I asked for a recommendation regarding which style of therapy she thought I might want to explore, she said, “Pyschiatrists only work with patients on the medication side of things; you’ll need to work with your therapist on different therapeutic methods.”). She’s awesome, and I believe she cares (I might even have a tiny crush on her), but this is kinda frustrating to me as I feel like I am paying a medication machine.

My therapist, now, is rad and I find my times with him are very helpful. I really don’t feel much overlap with these, now, disparate service providers.

Has anyone else experienced a similar situation? If so, how have y
all worked with it? I’m not sure it’s bad, even though it’s not exactly what I want.

Anyway, I’d love to hear what y’all think/have experienced.

Salud.
-trav

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My experience has been that all my med providers in the past (MD/PA) have been more medication focused and not really focused on any interventions or therapeutic work. So, I don’t miss it. My therapist is good but we don’t talk about diagnosis, medication, or symptoms very often. I wish that she was more integrated into the overall care as it seems like the two of them don’t communicate despite being in the same clinic. My therapist is a psychologist and I get the sense that she is a bit anti-medication but keeps her hands out of it.

Bottom line, I don’t think it’s uncommon to have a division. I understand why you miss what you had before. It’s good that you like both your current providers, though. Hopefully you can be active about advocating for your needs if things don’t get met or you feel like you want more than what either one of them is offering. Good luck!

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@quietlylost

Thank you for sharing your experience and advice.

I think that the current situation is prob how things will keep going, so (you’re def right) my advocating for what I need will be one of the best tools for me to use in order to meet my needs.

Thank you. Take care.
-trav

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This is the dream. A medical professional not only able to see the benefit of a more holistic perspective, but also equipped with ability to help you in such a multifaceted manner.

Unfortunately, the reality for most is, just that, a dream.

My personal opinion on the matter, is the fields conflict through matter of interest.

  • Therapists and psychologists are often intrigued with the ‘working with what you’ve got’ approach and you will often find a ‘stigma’ of being anti-medication within the field. As medical professionals, they are usually required to remain impartial on such topics though, as medication is not what they are paid to facilitate or give their opinion on.
  • Psychiatrists, likewise often only have their ‘expertise’ in the field of pharmaceutical medication and it’s varying effects and uses as treatment. I’m all but positive there is also a liability clause at play here, where if they were to give unsolicited advice, psychologically, they would be held liable. Thus, it is likely they would avoid exposing themselves to such situations.

The two professions, though both often used for many situations, to treat the same issue, are both rather extensive and different degrees to compete.
The number of professionals with both the time and passion to gain an expertise in both would be few and far between. ~

You were very lucky, indeed, to have such a ‘bad ass’ psychiatrists pre-move.
I am glad you here you are still getting on with both your current providers. :slightly_smiling_face:

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