Sleep study and sleep in general

Hi guys.

I recently did a sleep study, which involved one night of "traditional"sleep study, taking 5 mini naps during the day (to test how long it takes to fall asleep) and finally a 24h period during which they “locked me up” in the dark, where I wasn’t allowed any stimulations, aka no phone, no TV, no reading, no talking, etc, just lie down in the dark and try to fall asleep. (I could just turn the lights on for mealtimes).

Do we agree this sounds like torture???

It’s very recent, but I’m still confused and slightly traumatised. I knew I wasn’t sleeping very well, but this was possibly the worst nights ever. I don’t think I managed to sleep more than 2-4h each, kept turning and tossing, my brain was through the roof and I was exhausted. No meds allowed of course.

I have the weird impression that ADHD brains just won’t calm down if they’re internally too exited and externally under aroused. I had already noted that playing video games worked to calm me down IN SOME CASES at night, in contrary to general advices. Sometimes passing out from exhaustion seems like the only way.

Anyway. Now I’m afraid and hate the idea of going to bed. I hated it so much I’ve wished someone could knock me down with a hammer the second night. Seriously. Not sure what the doctor’s appointment will turn out to be.

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Hi there!

24 hours in a dark chamber to try and simulate sleeping conditions already sound weird to me, I mean… we’re supposed to sleep 8 right? Honestly, if I’d done the same thing I would probably not have slept at all, so I get what you’re saying.

This seems to be a thing that comes back every time I seem to have it under control to me. It can be a bit problematic since so many things are focused on starting in the morning and well, we (or at least, I) then surely haven’t had our 8 hours yet then. In my experience it’s something that differs from brain to brain (quite literally) in what works for them to fall asleep. I usually listen to relaxing music or other sounds, or just wait till my head’s like ‘nope, now I’m tired’ and decides it wants to sleep.

For me it’s important how I feel myself, what were my main emotions at a day or what am I nervous of or for, or even just excited about or just whatever emotion decided to join the rollercoaster that morning. From others with ADHD at my college I heard they take some sleeping medicine (I forgot the name actually) or leaving their phone or tablet out of their sleeping room. For me that’s what relaxes me with a video and some relaxing music when I lie down and stare at the ceiling for at least an hour.

I tend to go to what works for me and right now I’m trying to figure that out again as well since I have exams coming up this week and sleep hasn’t been my strongest point the past 2 weeks. I personally wouldn’t worry too much about the fact that you didn’t sleep much in 24 hours in that situation. That wouldn’t end well for me as well, as for the hours of sleep I usually just satisfy myself with is probably around 5 hours. Sometimes I make it, sometimes it’s about 4 and in bad situations… well, you probably know.

I hope it helps to let you know that you are not alone in these kinds of situations, stay strong and don’t hesitate to ask around, I’m guessing more people here have experience with sleeping problems as well. :wink:

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I’ve just been told to go do a sleep study, and my friend was allowed to do hers at home due to covid, she had to attach a bunch of monitors and try to sleep which sounded horrendous enough….

24 hours in a room sounds more like a research experiment than a medical treatment, I think I’d flat out refuse.

I only learnt recently that sleep issues are really common with adhd people… Im hoping the medication will help regulate it all.

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In my case meds only made my sleeping issues worse. And I hear this more often. So don’t count on meds to mitigate this particular symptom.

The only thing that ever helped me sleep better is to use something called the 4-7-8 breathing technique (look it up to see how it works). You might have to do 10 breathing rounds or so. Doing the technique you have to focus on breathing (which can feel like a chore before you start) so all other thoughts are pushed aside. My brain also relaxes from the breathing and transfers to a more sleep ready state.

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I’m finding I’m better with my meds, im still a late one to bed, often because I’m hyper fixated… but my quality of sleep is better…. Hay fever has hit me hard lately so I’m experimenting with anti histamines again…

without the drugs I fall asleep as soon as I get home from work and wake up in the middle of the night…

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