Speech: is this a thing?


#1

Hey Brains,

Question: Am I the only one who can’t talk. I feel like I am always making up my own words, adding new twists to common sayings…
(ex. Hitting the horse until it dies??? Correction: Beating a dead horse)

I really don’t articulate words very well, and it drives me nuts.

Does anyone else have this problem?


#2

Yeah. I throw words around like lego blocks. When I’m looking for an analogy, or trying to remember a common saying, I have better luck just making up my own. It’s ended up being a positive thing, sort of. I like that I can write with originality. I prefer to make up a new metaphor/analogy/saying rather than use somebody else’s.

I never really thought about it before, but it could very well have started through what you have described, and just evolved into an active form of creative writing.

On the whole though, I’m pretty happy with writing. It’s when I am speaking directly with somebody that I find it difficult to explain things.


#3

me too, I’m always making up new analogies, to explain what I’m trying to say. I also get ly metters mixed between words😁 or the frustrating one is when I completely forget the word I need to finish the sentence and then I’m so hard concentrating on trying to remember the word that I forget what I was talking about completely.


#4

I agree. I am much better on paper.


#5

I know, right? Talk about awkward long pauses when your trying to do a presentation.


#6

I also tend to forget words. Sometimes I think about what I want to write down and the next second I can’t remember the bloody word. :open_mouth:


#7

Oh yes! Count me in as well! I can forget words totally. I can also know the word in English, but not in Dutch (my native language) (and sometimes the other way around, but I feel like it’s mostly a lack of vocabulary knowledge). I can also lose track of what I was saying - when I’m thinking about something else than what I’m saying (at that moment) and then I mostly just block totally -I might still speak (especially when just talking to someone, not a presentation) but just saying things like “You know, the thing”.
I never have never had too much of a problem with it. But I was also blessed with have a friend who understood me even when I said things like “the thing of the thing of you know who.”


#8

Ha ha… When I came back from South America the first time, I’d be talking to somebody, and I’d know the Spanish word, but couldn’t for the life of me remember the English word. I’d have to go back to the Latin root of the word, and reverse engineer it back into English.

I still have to reverse engineer words sometimes, but not from another language, just to try and find the right (or even wrong but useable) word in English.


#9

Hey Nicole!

It’s funny to hear of people having the same issue. It doesn’t feel like it’s ever discussed, but it drives me crazy. My friends usually laugh at me when I do… it can be pretty funny. Presentations are the worst, though. Particularly the questions section. I can practice my speech in and out to reduce the stutter or forgetfulness, but there’s always a question or two that I wasn’t expecting. I usually know the answer, but retrieving and explaining that answer is often a crash and burn situation.
(Note: I couldn’t remember the saying: “crash and burn”… almost wrote “burn and fire” lol)


#10

All. The. TIME! It’s so annoying and it makes me look so stupid most of the time. I’ll always say it somewhat right, but it isn’t the right was to say it.
My friends give me so much shit for it too, like I’m TRYING!!! :sob:
But I feel like this is an everyone thing to an extent, but for me it’s basically all the time. When I’m writing it’s fine, but SPEAKING is just the wooooooooorst!


#11

Haha! I totally feel the same way! You always know your not getting through to people when all you see are blank faces!


#12

I think the biggest communication problem I have, is that I seem to be able to say things that really piss people off, without any intent on my part.

It almost seems random sometimes. I’ll say something, and then it’ll turn out that the person I’m speaking with has had a bad experience, or manages to interpret what I’m saying as the exact opposite of what I mean.

I used to feel that way. I had a presentation one time at uni. I was a sweating, stuttering mess. It was horrible.

But then, I was suddenly able to stand in front of groups of people and give briefings, lectures etc. without any problems.

I suspect the corner was turned when I went from hating picking up the phone at work, to working in a call centre and handling hundreds of phonecalls a week. It cured my fear of talking on the phone. And running a few business meetings didn’t hurt either.

These days I conduct crew handover meetings and other briefings on a daily basis at work, I co-ordinate things with management, contractors, engineers etc., and it’s like I can’t see what all the fuss was about.

There are still many, many times where I get the rolling eyes from the people I’m talking to though, like they’ve asked me a question, and I’ve answered a completely different question. Or given an answer that puts me in the “idiot” basket. I’m never 100% sure what they want from me, and things which seem clearly to be good and valid ideas to me (and have maybe worked well in other situations) can often be completely misunderstood, or just written off as “he doesn’t know what he’s talking about”.


#13

Liiiiiterally! Then you get those really close friends who completely understand what you mean when you say something like, “The thing on the thing by the thing for that person.” and they just GET IT!!! My friends like to joke that I have my own language and only few can understand it, lol.


#14

Gosh, I’ve noticed that! As a writer, I’ve managed to use it as an asset. People find my images and analogies fresh/entertaining/what have you, but I’m generally just recording what things sound like in my head. In that capacity, I can function a bit like a human rorschach or something, like just throwing stuff out and seeing how different people react. But, yeah, I do often find myself trying to explain an analogy or a connection that made perfect sense in my head (I also have synesthesia so I can often visualize connections before I can perfectly articulate them). It really just depends on who I’m talking to; some people love it, some people can’t run with it.


#15

Exactly my point. When I studied creative writing, we were jumped on if we used hackneyed phrases or cliches. I never had any problems with that.

I grew up learning to distrust unoriginality. I find it fun to invent a new phrase, or even a new word. And I take pride in being original.

I can also relate to the feeling of having written something that makes perfect sense to me, but nobody else gets.


#16

My college issue!


#17

Yes. Starting a sentence and forgetting where it was going to end. Mixing up languages. Sometimes feeling like speech is impossible. Stumbling over your tongue. Writing is easier.

But reading has also been difficult. Extremely slow and very often unfocused when boring. I still sigh when anything has many many words. I get disheartened. I don’t like a fat book. I like my ereader so don’t see how thicka book is.


#18

I am the same way with my e-reader! I’ve been getting into audio books recently. It’s been a real game changer.

I feel like when I read and become bored, it’s like my brain wipes the slate clean every time I start reading the next paragraph.


#19

Yes that happens a lot to me


#20

I TOTALLY do this. My brain often tries to remember the names of household appliances and just replaces the names with their functions, or something close (oven = “slow microwave” or dryer = “clothes oven”) Thank goodness a lot of these things are named after what they do lol!