UNIVERSITY HELP!! stressed and overwhelmed + is liberal arts in the USA a good idea


#1

Hello!
I’m in my final year of JC (that’s grade 12 High School) and I need some help!

I’m from Singapore so I’m not sure what the US university system/ liberal arts system in general looks like and how it suits ADD brains. I’m really not sure what I’d like to major in university - I’m interested in theater, psychology, politics, economics and literature but don’t feel secure enough in the career pathways + being able to sustain interest to do it as a major alone for 4 years. That said, I have a tendency to be very good at subjects I’m passionate about (generally humanities) and terrible at subjects I don’t like (science and math oops). I’m aware that the liberal arts system means I need to take science for 2 years anyway…

So basically - anyone who’s taken a liberal arts degree or any degree in the US really - I’m wondering, were you able to sustain interest in it? Did you benefit from the many subjects?

And very very broadly – I need advice on where to go from here…

The university applications thing really really stresses me out and I have trouble drawing up a timeline of what to do next. I haven’t actually done my SATs (I’m taking the A Level system). I don’t know how to manage thinking about what I want to do, where I want to do it + applying etc etc

Any thoughts on taking a gap year to have more time to figure it out?


#2

So, I can’t speak on Liberal Arts, but I am on the other side of the spectrum majoring in science. Any college you attend will require a well-rounded education, and there is no getting around taking classes that are not interesting, and even seem irrelevant to your interests. I can say there are usually “simple” classes that you can take to satisfy the graduation requirements, and that goes particularly for science and math classes. You can work with your advisor to find what might best suit you. It never hurts to ask other students what they took, sometimes you can narrow down what might be a good fit.

But, since science is one of those “difficult” subjects, there are a number of options. I personally found science classes that took me outside were the most entertaining. Although, science may still poses a challenge of staying interested and engaged in the material, it’s usually simple enough that you can work through for an easy grade, so don’t be intimidated. And use the tutoring services, they can be life savers.

Last, don’t be afraid to ask for accommodations. By law, U.S. colleges have to accommodate for ADD/ADDHD students.

Gap year: As long as you are doing what you want to do, and finding your own way… there is nothing wrong with that. I took 8 years off after failing out of community college the first time. But colleges seem understanding about time off. Just consider from the employer perspective, they usually want to see that you did something with that time like travel.

Also, I’m not sure what you mean that you will have to take two years of science. It’s normally two classes in science. Like, I have to take two art classes. I’m in my third year and haven’t taken either, yet. So you may want to check on that with the degree requirements with whatever school(s) you’re looking at. They do vary.

Hope this helps