What to do/finding a routine when there are no obligations?

Hey Brains!

Just new to the forum, I got diagnosed a litte less than a year ago.
I’m an AI students and my university summer break just started, I have only a
few resits to do, and no other obligations whatsoever.

I’m really struggeling with figuring out what to do with time, as of now, I’m kinda just getting bored all the time, and I just don’t know what to do.
I want to build a routine, but I don’t even know what to do with the majority of my day. Does anyone have some good ideas, advice, or tricks or even just anything interesting that you do with your days when having a long break?

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For me in times like that I’ve found it’s still important to establish a basic routine. For example, get up and have coffee, maybe play with the animals, then take a shower. I will sometimes mix things different days such as playing video games, watching a TV series, going outside, walking on a treadmill, listening to music, or watching friends stream. I find that sticking to a routine once I find what I like really helps. It gives me a sense of structure and progress. I also try to plan things like grocery store trips or hanging out with friends in advance. It gives me stuff to look forward to, and it also limits the poor planning or impulsivity of the moment.

It’s hard to say what will work for you. But it can help to reflect on what you enjoy and what you haven’t been able to do much of because of school. Make sure that you’re taking time for self care, but also try to prevent getting into a couch or bed rut if you can. Good luck!

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Read. Set goals for longer-term reading accomplishments. Have you ever read “War and Peace” by Tolstoy? Well, now’s your chance! :slight_smile:

Personally, I am not finding it helpful to try to create a routine. I know, this is often good advice for ADHD people, but I’m finding that this Covid-lockdown situation is not well addressed, at least for me, by creating some kind of restrictions or strictures on my freedom. Instead, I’m finding it helpful to get obsessive about things. I’m trying to let myself get obsessive about reading (see first paragraph above!) and about exercise, for example. You may need a routine, but for me, routine is the opposite of what I want out of this free time. It’s free, so, I intend to (finally!) be productive with it, and happy about it, precisely BECAUSE it’s not reduced to a capitalist-western-post-agricultural-soul-destroying routine. Routine destroys my productivity during regular-work months; thank goodness they aren’t all up in my face with early morning routines now!

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