Why make your bed

Hi fellow people of this community,

Here’s a more lighthearted question for you all: Why make your bed? I tried looking it up to see the benefits of doing so, but even then they kinda seem dumb and it just seems to be something that’s cultural that doesn’t really have a real good reason to be done. A bed that’s made is just going to get destroyed every night you go to bed in it so what’s the point? It’s not like sleeping in an unmade bed is going to be uncomfortable either. But if someone has a good reason please tell me :p…
So long,

TheWoomy27

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Ehh it’s kinda a thing of personal preference. I don’t do it always, but I find it’s a helpful 2-second pause to breathe and get my head on straight for the day. I don’t do it really neatly either, just fluffing the blankets and moving pillows back into space works!

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I did it every day for a couple of years. It was nice to start the day with a mindset of being organized and seeing my tidy bed later in the day helped give that mindset a little boost. It was also something I could hook other routines on to. I haven’t kept it up. Other things ended up taking higher priority, but while I was doing it I felt like I got a return on my effort

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If you have a dedicated bedroom that you don’t go into during the day, by all means: leave it any way you want. Or if you go to work right after breakfast and don’t get near it anyway. But if you tend to come across the unmade bed during the day, you might want to think about it.

An unmade bed is an open invitation. Even if you don’t actually lie down, chances are it had you thinking about it for a brief moment! If you’re easily distracted, that can put you right out of activity mode and into slacker mode. Or at least that’s my experience.

I inhabit one room that’s both bedroom and working area, and having the bed there means the transformation to working area will be incomplete all day. Also, it takes up a lot of space if I don’t fold it away (it’s a futon that I fold into a sofa), so the room will feel more cramped and untidy and messier than is good for my focus.

I even forced myself into the habit of putting it away before breakfast because back when I had breakfast first, I wouldn’t go on and make the bed right away. I’d lie down in it, maybe half make it, then get distracted by something that’s part of slack space and suddenly it was two hours later and I hadn’t started my day yet. (We also had a cat at the time. Without him, I’d probably have taken less. Not much ,though.)

I still like to lie down after breakfast and listen to some music until the coffee has run its course, but with the bed folded into a sofa, it’s just so much easier to get up off.

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I think that makes the most sense. Although in both college and my home, i have a top bunk which I find makes it much harder to make up and it’s not really something you can easily see if made or not (in my house, at college not so much but I don’t tend to do my work in my room anyways, I just go to the lounge, or a study room which is a part of the dormatory). I was thinking about getting a beddy’s sheet before college had even started which my parents where pretty against (I knew I wasn’t going to be able to maintain doing the bed on my own, so why not ;~;…) I might get it for this year though and hopefully whenever people come into my room they won’t mention it XD. Let’s hope I can use the power of god and anime which lie on my side to keep up all the things I need to do!

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I actually bought a book of random facts called ‘why you should never make your bed’ :grin:

It was in Dutch though,and I have no idea if it’s available in English.

Anyway, the page on bedmaking was about how bed bugs thrive in a warm damp environment, ie if you close your bed up. Which is great because now I still don’t make my bed, and can justify it scientifically :sweat_smile:

I like Max’s points though. And I do make my bed if I want to use it for packing a suitcase or folding washing on it or something like that, or if someone is coming to fix the window or whatever.

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Works for me. I make my bed nearly every morning. Not sue WHY it works, but it works for me. I’m extremely ADHD on a lot of subjects, and yet rather obsessive-compulsive and anal-retentive and neat-nik on some subjects in almost an exactly opposite-to-ADHD way. Making my bed, the actual task of walking around the bed once or twice while pulling up the covers and laying the pillows out neatly, somehow creates a sense of completeness or perfected-ness to the act of sleeping. It closes the door on night-time.

Funny thing is, I VERY often take a nap on my well-made bed. And often the nap is soon after I made the bed. In fact, my best morning routine is, to get up early, with the sun; make the bed, do a few other things, go get a big bowl of breakfast cereal, stare numbly at television coverage of some sport or other (Tour de France, lately), then, about an hour after I first woke up, go BACK to bed. In my clothes, on top of the made-up bed. And that’s when I have a super-nap. About two, maybe three hours, sometimes; sometimes just a half-hour. Of VERY deep sleep. Love it, and it won’t work if I haven’t made my bed. Can’t be UNDER the covers for the nap, have to be OVER them and they have to be in their well-made-up state. Weird no?

Not at all. If you were under the covers, it wouldn’t be a nap. It would be sleeping.

My morning routine is similar: Get up, do bath stuff, put on clothes, make bed, often while making breakfast and sometimes forgetting about the bed stuff until I’m back in my room, get newspaper or call the newspaper because my paper has been stolen again, have breakfast, then lie down on the sofa with the paper while listening to some music, drift into a quick nap, and then I’m ready to face the day.

I know a lot of people who want to optimize their sleep time by getting up as late as possible, but I prefer optimizing my waking-up time over more sleep. Makes me feel more awake than sleeping in would.

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