Wonder what it's like to be neurotypical


#1

So I was diagnosed in October with ADHD although one of my teachers told me back in 2016 that I probably had it. I kinda realized this year that most of the things that have gotten me in trouble in class or with other students was because of ADHD and I just really want to know what it is like for people who are neurotypical. Like how does someone without executive dysfunction just automatically feel the urge to get all of their work done, or how to people not consistently get distracted by everything or feel the need to blurt stuff out right as it pops in your head? Or interrupt people or talk excessively? I’m curious how many of you brains consistently think about this and if any of you have friends who are neurotypical who have explained it to you.

Edit: also does being on meds make it any better? cause I am supposed to start taking vyavance but I’m afraid it will make me more anxious


#2

I wonder this every single day… I’d give anything to have a neurotypical brain for just one day.


#3

I do wonder about it but I always imagine that it would be quite boring


#4

I do agree… however, I also feel like… life would be easier. Because life is hard…


#5

Every day of my life … Sometimes, rarely, it happens that I almost appreciate beeing neuroatypical though ! Don’t know if those times are worth the rest though ^^


#6

I think it would have made my life… a lot more consistent and organized… those are the most powerful things that I struggle with.
Before knowing I was ADHD… the sinking feeling of overwhelming having to get the house “semi ready” for guest coming over…
Was stressful, just to watch it unfold as the hours went by.
Looking at my friends homes and everything was always so nice. And they themselves so well together. Made me feel incompetent.
Another thing I am 52 years old and I have 3 kids, 20,19 and 11 and I still have hundreds of pictures in boxes and their baby scrapbooks undone… waiting for the extra time…
I love myself and all my quirks. But I dont know how a normal brain works I can’t even keep track of my own… without it doing everything at once and get nothing done all day…:triumph::cry:


#7

Just imagine that even if your friends’ homes look well organized, they hide all sorts of stuff in their closets :slight_smile: Which may even be true!

Having guests over always majorly disrupted things for me – I would put away all the “randomly organized” papers on my desk and table into some boxes and then it was very difficult find things! And other things would get stashed in random closets and may stay there for a long time. Meanwhile I would find thing X when I am looking for thing Y! Have to laugh at this to keep from getting stressed out!


#8

@Kaylasings422: I’m curious how many of you brains consistently think about this…

I’ve thought about it quite a bit. I can’t say for certain if I’ve ever experienced a “neuro-typical” day, but I believe I have had one or two experiences that came close.

There was a day before I was diagnosed with ADHD that I megadosed on caffeine by accident. I think it was that fabled ‘bulletproof’ coffee; the one that you mix a tablespoon of butter into it to extend the effects of the caffeine. Instead of becoming ultra hyper and frantic from the stimulants everything suddenly became… calmer and more focused.

All the white noise and fog that clutters my mind suddenly subsided and there was an odd sensation in its place: a peaceful silence. I thought about a task that needed to be done, and it was like my body started moving to complete the action before I was fully aware I had decided to do it. Rather than fighting my mind and body, I was in complete control. I started making a list in my head of other tasks I needed to do, all the while my body continued to dutifully fold the laundry in front of me on autopilot.

Somehow I wasn’t even tempted to deviate away from the chores to something more “fun” because I was at peace and content with the knowledge that I was performing an important task that was benefiting my family. I felt proud and energized and calm and in control.

I wasn’t afraid I would fail because I had the sense that I couldn’t fail. It was freaky how my body seemed to anticipate my movements before I had even fully planned them. I was graceful and swift, knocking out several chores in the space of a single hour.

And then the effects started to wear off…

The fog came back and started to make my mental list of tasks hazy and unreadable. I started to trip over my own feet. Tasks began to overlap and jumble together until I was working on three simultaneously depending on which room I walked into, but not making any progress on them. And then I abandoned the chores all together in frustration.

I’m still waiting to experience a moment of beautiful clarity like that again. It haunts me to remember it. It was the most amazing thing I’ve ever experienced and I’m terrified I’ll never experience it again.

You know how athletes train with added weights on their bodies to improve their performance? Because when they remove the added weight their bodies are still expecting that level of resistance? I wonder if those of us with ADHD could achieve much more than an average “neuro-typical” if we were given the same brain because we are used to fighting against all the resistance within our minds?

Just a small ponderance.


#9

Yeah I tend to have stuff organized but in a very specific messy way, and my grandma would try and clean and mess up my entire system. My sister says I’m a hoarder, but I really think I just have a ton of stuff that I haven’t organized yet. Plus if I dont keep stuff I’ll probably forget about it.


#10

Ahem… Yes. No comment. No. What’s on Netflix? Help.

I absolutely hate going to houses where people say stuff like “Oh, the house is such a mess, I am so sorry for the state of it, you must think I’m a grot”. When I can’t see a damn thing out of place.


#11

That’s easy. It’s all magical lollipop land for them, with rainbow staircases leading straight up to the top level, and free ice cream for all, as soon as they flash out their VIP ALL ACCESS cards. Bastards! :wink:


#12

:joy::joy:


#13

omg yes I hate that
legit every time I go to my friends apartment and she complains about it being messy and you cant even see the floor of my room


#14

Hi Kayla. I wonder the same thing! My husband is nuerotypical and I’ve even had conversations with him saying I wish I my brain was more like his. I’ve always wondered how nice it must be like… to not have an overactive brain about ERRRTHING.

Also I relate to you about not taking medications for FEAR of it making me more anxious. That’s one of my issues I would say… I have a fear of many things which is why I’m an anxious person. One thing that is currently going through my head is the fear that the birth control I’m on is going to mess up my hormones and make me worse (first time really taking it). Which I know is irrational considering millions of woman around the world are taking BC. Sometimes I just feel like a hypecondriach. Lol. Honestly I think just talking to a therapist would be beneficial. Idk if you have done that yet but we should both give that a go. It’s just nice to know we’re not alone. :slight_smile:


#15

It would certainly be easier and sometimes i crave for an easier life but I try reminding myself as well as my son who gets these same feelings, that easier doesn’t always mean better.


#16

I can tell you what happened the first time I was taking medication, about two weeks ago, and got to 30mg Concerto in the morning. I was reading something on my mobile, suddenly looked up and told her: “I see you moving, and I see one of the cats running out the corner of my eye, but I don’t feel like I need to focus on it, but can just keep doing what I’m doing…”
She said “Oh, so you’re coming back to normal again, then?”
And I almost cried from happiness telling her “This is the first time I’ve ever experienced ‘normal’…!”

It was quite an emotional experience for me to not be distracted by every sound or movement in my sights. Hopefully you’ll slowly step up on your medication until you have the right dose and medication to experience that too. And remember to tell your doctor if you have any negative side-effects! That way they can find a different medication if necessary.

Good luck!


#17

About BC, there are different strengths, depending on various factors, so when my wife (who’s quite small, 165cm, 60-65kg) was taking BC made for average women in the US and Europe, it was too strong for her and ae didn’t feel great taking them. But it IS possible to ask doctors if it’s possible to have lower dose pills, and if they would still be effective for you, so IF they don’t work out, maybe that’s an option?


#18

I AM NOT NOW, NOR WILL I EVER BE, INTERESTED IN ANYTHING THAT SEEKS BY ITS VERY EXISTENCE TO MAKE ME TYPICAL!! PERIOD!!
WHY FIT IN WHEN I WAS BORN TO STAND OUT?!!


#19

Damn straight buddy! I’ve always found “normal” people to be on average 87.3% quite boring. The more normal, the more boring.

Normal is the lowest common denominator.
It’s the freeway traffic jam, when the dirt track is so much quicker.
It’s the same answer that everyone recites in monotone, when the question demands so much more.
It’s generic vanilla when you really want rum and raisin mixed with boysenberry twist in a coffee mug with chopsticks.

There’s no reason to lower yourself to normal, apart from making normal people feel better.


#20

Once I saw my world in TECHNICOLOR, going back to black and white became IMPOSSIBLE!!