Work: How do you tell if it's the ADHD or if you actually have too much work?

#1

Hi guys…I’m new to the forum and new to my diagnosis…I’m one of those girls who didn’t get diagnosed until her 30s because I’m inattentive (except for the constant foot bouncing). Lately I’ve been having a really bad struggle at work, where I have to juggle multiple tasks throughout the day and they’re all really important, because I work in the medical field.

I feel constantly overwhelmed, because I have to answer the phone while I’m doing other tasks and it seems like I can never complete what I’m doing before someone is adding another task to my pile. Several of my coworkers have said that I have too much work given to me, and I definitely have more on my plate than any of my current coworkers, but I also know that people who worked here before me were able to do my same job. I’ve definitely improved with managing my workload and completing tasks before moving on to the next since I was diagnosed and started taking medication and maintaining a bullet journal for work, but I’m still feeling overwhelmed and missing things.

Does anyone know of any tools to use or ways that I can tell if it’s a problem with me or with the job?

9 Likes

#2

It’s super important to note that just because other people worked there before you and were able to do the exact same job, doesn’t mean you have to work at the same caliber. That’s drawing a comparison and that is a dangerous thing to get into the habit of. Try to avoid comparing yourself to other people, hard though it may be. If you are feeling constantly overwhelmed at work ask if you can drop one thing, give it to someone who doesn’t have too much on their plate, if your manager allows it. See if taking one thing off your plate helps. Also track what you can, see how much you’re doing in one day, one week, one month. Only you know how much you can handle, and how much you can do without feeling so overwhelmed that it’s causing you stress. :heart:

4 Likes

#3

Try chunking your tasks. Break things down into bite sized pieces and make lists! My phone is my best friend sometimes

0 Likes

#4

I struggle with the same thing; having a job with a lot of responsibilities and (unfortunately) also a lot of administrative tasks, I never seem to be able to finish things as I should. Even now I’m diagnosed and medicated, I still haven’t figured out how to get my work done within the hours they pay me for it. It is one of the reasons I subscribed to this forum today, because I realized I could use some peer support. So I don’t know if I can offer you any useful advice, but I will follow this thread and might share some of the things that helped me in the past.

0 Likes

#5

Write it out! Don’t depend on your short term memory. Make a list!

0 Likes

#6

You sound exactly like me. I have struggled for years in my position, feeling overwhelmed and unable to keep up. Recently I started medication as well as a bullet journal. These have boosted my productivity a small, but noticable amount. I’m also keeping lists now of tasks that need doing, and I’ve implemented a daily and weekly checklist to remember recurring tasks. However, I still don’t finish everything I think I should, and I still get distracted by non-work things during the day (um, now being a case in point). I am constantly reevaluating and trying new strategies. I don’t have any better advice, but just know you’re not alone.

0 Likes

#7

It usually is too much work. At least in American workplaces!

I would have concrete advice in the IT/Software world. It sounds tough to navigate in the medical world. But maybe this part is general: I usually find I’ve waited too long to raise the issue to my supervisor.

My impostor syndrome causes me to absorb the overwork. Sometimes this actually hides the issue from supervisors; the work was getting done, and they were trying not to micromanage, so they did not even realize the impact it was having.

If raising to supervisor isn’t helping, of course there are also the personal methods. And if changing personal organization doesn’t help, there’s the sage advice: “Change your organization, or change your Organization.” (If you are able. And if not, maybe it is not too late to change roles, subfields, or locations?)

There is an XKCD about that last point…

Settling (https://www.xkcd.com/1768/)


As for other tools in the meantime. Even with a good “system” like Bullet Journal (or what I prefer: Todoist), the speed and portability of postits can be really good for the interrupting phone calls etc.


Nonlinear post. Oops.

The fact that coworkers think you might have too much coming to you: that’s important. You may have become a sponge for the overflows in the system, just as I have … at more than one place, I must admit.

Make sure to talk to someone who can make system changes, whether your supervisor, HR, or something like that!

1 Like

#8

hi, im new, just joined today… its my work problem which brings me here… im having the same problem, and im in medical line too… my work involve seeing patients in the clinic and to treat them, different patients have got different problems… some have few and some have single problem… i just restarted back my work after a very long MC for other medical reason… when i came back to work now, i feel like im being pressurised by my peers to work faster…i am confused, whether is it i am too slow or the work is actually a lot… how can i be sure about it so that i feel less pressurised?

0 Likes

#9

I do think the fact your coworkers have noted your extra tasks will benifit you if you do talk with your supervisor.

However, I doubt you didn’t think of that before so I suspect your afraid of upsetting your supervisor. In which case I think talking a step back and really analyzing what is going through your brain after each task is assigned probably will help. Now I am very much aware of the stigma and fear of telling someone what has caused you to feel overwhelmed today. But, I honestly believe it’s better to be honest about it but you know your supervisor better then I do.

I definitely think if you don’t tell your supervisor tell your coworkers. They seem to want to help. I would ask them if they could assist you with tasks or take one of your plate completely. Likely everyone sees what a hard worker you are and would have no issue helping.

0 Likes

#10

I have much the same issue. I ranted and raved about it in another thread How do you Identify How Hard a Task Is For You recently (and am still ranting there, evidently).

To me, it feels like this-- if they need you to rivet widgets, and the average person can rivet somewhere around 1 widget per hour, maybe a bit faster, then why do they ask you to do 155 widgets a day? And minimum 600 a week? Why wouldn’t they ask for something reasonable, like 8 or 10 per day? I always feel like the workplace wants me to do ten people’s jobs.

0 Likes