Would you consider your ADHD to be a disability ?

Would you consider your ADHD to be a disability ? I consider my dyspraxia and ADHD to be disabilities but aspergers traits to be only just traits , without having a disability ?

Eg, cognitive empathy, anticipating the feeling, emotion and reaction before you act. Someone had to tell me this. , because I think it can require a focused mind .

Definitions of disability vary across the world !

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I don’t consider my adhd to be a disability. In fact, I’m kinda glad to have it. It’s a strength if u know how to use it. Lemme share a stat with u: 72% of successful entrepreneurs show adhd traits(i dunno how many have a diagnosis).
The above shows that adhders can do awesome stuff. There are many celebs who have adhd and some of em have even credited their success to adhd. It’s just a matter of perspective, ig.
My only advice would be that the initial situation we are in can’t be changed so we gotta accept it and move on. It’s not in ur control what you’re born with but u can control what u die with. Crying won’t solve shit. No offence intended.

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People with ADHD are 300% more likely to staart your own business

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ADHD can be considered a disability if the traits impair you. For instance, some people have traits which make it difficult to keep a job for any long period of time, which can seriously hamper their ability to provide for themselves without assistance. This much of an impairment might be considered a disability.

However, ADHD traits can be a benefit, too. In one famous case, Sir Richard Branson has succeeded remarkably in life because of his ADHD. He is an out-of-the-box thinker, and because he works with people with different talents, their teamwork produces legendary results.

In my case, until I started on Adderall, I was scared that I would eventually lose my new job. I realized that my previous success as a tech support worker was aided by my ADHD traits (interest-based attention helping me drive into tech troubleshooting with enthusiasm; quickly switching from one customer’s request to the next and putting the last one out of my mind automatically, thanks to my distractibility).
My new job requires me to maintain focus and not get distracted. It did not have the constant novelty that my previous job did, and so I found myself struggling. (It also didn’t help that I started my new job with a boatload of anxiety caused by the job I did between the one I excelled in and my current one, but that’s a totally different story.)

The Adderall helps me to the point where I can maintain focus and build new routines, but it still takes effort. I don’t feel like I’m limited in the type of work that I can do and do well. I still respond just as well to novelty, but I can focus me attention on the things which I had struggled with a short time ago.

I would but characterize my ADHD traits as a disability, since I don’t have trouble staying employed even in jobs I didn’t like. However, I can clearly see now hope my ADHD has effected my ability to advance in my career previously. Being diagnosed and treated has certainly helped me.

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I think its a disability in respect that society is set up for neorotypical brains so it puts you at a disadvantage at school and work for instance but i dont think that having adhd means theres something wrong with your brain, i think its an evolutionary process which has helped our species come so far for example learning how to control fire, i think would have needed somebody who thought differently who was less risk adverse.
Its no different to how some people are naturally geneticaly more physically adept and some people more naturaly intellectual, its this mix of genetics which as helped is to get where we are now, like the ingredients of a cake, if you only had flour no matter how much you wanted a cake, it would still just be a bowl of flour, so i feel without the adhd brain as well as many other genetic traits then wed all still be living in caves lol well thats what i think anyway :joy:

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I really liked this may i copy and paste it on my “Ways to explain stuff”

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No, I consider the rest of the world to be the disability which consistently tries, very very hard, to prevent me from being my usual average normal natural self. I’ve never ceased to be amazed at just how petulantly demanding the rest of the world is, that I comply with its notion of propriety just so I can be allowed to get along, and that demandingness and petulance is clearly much more of a dysfunction than anything which I bring to it. In the relationship between me and the rest of the world, I’m always the open-minded and accommodating one, I’m always the one who bends over backwards to meet halfway in the middle, I’m always the one who doesn’t get what he wants and yet realizes (with some wistfulness or chagrin) that in order to have a relationship you can’t always get what you want, and meanwhile the rest of the world is certainly the one which needs some therapy, a good hug, and maybe a solid whap on the back of the head and a stern order to start acting more like an adult and less like a cry-baby. It’s a bit like a John Wayne movie, with me as the gunslinger and the rest of the world as the squeaky-voiced short nerdy guy from the big city who can’t function without getting his nails manicured properly, I’m going to persevere and the childish city-slicker is either going to get shot by a tough bad guy about halfway through the movie, or held hostage, or he’s going to learn to stop whining and become a bit more plucky and just dang well bother to man it up a bit, in which case we’ll learn to like the city slicker while the gunslinger cocks his hat toward him at the end for a job (a very small job, but an important one) well done despite all expectations to the contrary. I’m the gunslinger, competent but excluded; the city-slicker is all those people in charge of the rest of the world, in very bad need of a stern lesson from Mr. Wayne but, alas, also for some gol’-dang reason the city-slicker is actually already in charge of things.

I’d like to try to put this more succinctly:

No, I’m not the problem. They are, with their unsupportive, demanding, selfish, needy, irrational, whiny expectations. I don’t abuse them like they abuse me. I’m the victim here, they’re the abusers, the ones who don’t open their minds to all people and all possibilities. I get squeezed involuntarily into their box. Why would that ever make me the problem?

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I guess it depends on what lens you apply and your lived experience. Being the father of a kid with an astonishingly rare disorder that presents with both severe physical limitations and cognitive impairments with severe risks for both complex morbidities and mortality, and having negotiated the hospital system and disability sector here and seen the devastating and severely disabling conditions affecting many of my daughter’s peers, I consider myself astonishingly fortunate. I have certainly accrued some psychic damage through being undiagnosed. Do I wish I were better able to negotiate the world? Sure. But in the scheme of things, I like my inquisitive brain, my unusual and surprising utterances, and the intensity of hyperfocus on things I love.

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Of course, thanks for asking, glad you liked it :slightly_smiling_face:

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I’m convinced ADHD is not a disability. It’s a difference. Our brain is different but not disabled. Our society is just built on how the neurotypical brain works. So therefore we can’t blend in with that. We can stand out though. And many people with ADHD have, in a good way. Including myself. As much as daily life can be quite the struggle sometimes, I’ve succeeded beyond most people my age by now. At 19, I’m making a name for myself as a singer locally, I’m about to move with my boyfriend in our own little home and it helped me to win the battle against ptsd and depression. Not many of my age can say those things. Most of them are still figuring out who they are and what they want in life. They still have to fight most of their inner demons that I fought already. And all that is partially thanks to my adhd. Who knows if you’ll see me at the Grammy awards in the future. That’s at least my dream. But I do know that if I do get there, I can thank my adhd for it.

So no, it’s really not a disability. It’s just a difference. It makes us stand out. And you should be proud of that. I’ve learned that I can’t blend in, so I’ll have to love to stand out. And I do by now.

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what a great attitude i completely agree.
You know you really got me thinking, i always compare myself to my siblings and how they find things so much easier than i do, but after reading your message it dawned on me that out of my siblings i was the first to move out of the family home without having to go back like they both did, i was the first to learn to drive, the first to get married, the first to have kids, and the first to start my own business, im not bosting its just helped me realise that yea i might struggle with day to day living but ive actually done much better in life than i give myself credit for, so thank you :slightly_smiling_face:

Hey do you have a youtube channel or anything, id love to hear you sing if you didn’t mind sharing.

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Thanks!!!

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You’re welcome! We are more likely to take risks and I usually notice that people with adhd can make very wise choices in the long run. Those big things are often overshadowed by the daily things you struggle with. But the accomplishments are still there and should be recognized. Be proud of the accomplishments you made by now. That way adhd becomes a blessing for you.

My YouTube channel is Cheyenne Vaes. I’ll give you the link:

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To me, it presents more as a misfitability than a disability.

I can do anything I want (theoretically), I just can’t do it at any moment or the way it’s expected or in time. And if it’s something I don’t see the point of, I can’t do it at all. But then it isn’t something I want.

What I also can’t do very well is control my ADHD. So while ADHD itself doesn’t feel like a disability, my inability to control it sometimes does.

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I think it’s important to acknowledge it as a mental disability/ illness. The definition for disability here is impairment in 2 or more life aspects, the usual one’s named for ADHD would probably be work/school/social life although I would also say safety and finances because usually the impulsivity, risk taking and inattention harms your health (higher risk of substance abuse/ injuries due to accidents (/ and ofcourse stress and trauma that can come with ADHD related problems) --> generally lower life expectancy) and the way you spend, we are also often disorganized and procrastinate wich further complicates things like paying bills/ taxes/ keeping appointments/ managing your household. ADHD is comorbid with depression and that usually is because we are forced to live in a way that does not align with our brains chemistry, we often think something is wrong with us or feel like we failed because society sees it that way. It’s estimated that by the age of 12, those with ADHD have received 20,000 more negative messages than their peers (that is 4.5 a day more, every day, from birth). It thus also does not only lead to depression but often also anxiety and low self-esteem. People with ADHD also often have less close friends. People with ADHD have a higher likely hood of becoming teenage parents due to risky sexual behaviours. Sleeping problems also are comorbid with ADHD which leads to a whole load of additional problems. ADHD is comorbid with multiple other more severe mental disorders due to genetic links. People with ADHD often struggle in contact with authority. There are probably many more things I have forgot to name but that is already a good few.
So now when my teacher told me “ADHD doesn’t exist, it is only an excuse for lazy people”, when I had to listen to so many people tell me “why don’t you try to do this” or “you just need to try harder” then ofcourse I am frustrated because in a world without prostetic environments that just isn’t the case, it is like telling a person with only one leg to just try harder to walk up the stairs. It doesn’t work like that and ofcourse I am trying, I put in more effort than most people even but often that struggle is invisible.
In conclusion, yes I consider ADHD a disability, I would say my life would be much easier without it and I am not ashamed of acknowledging that I am simply not able to do certain things the way neurotypical people do. Rightfully ADHD also is classified as a mental disability where I live and I am entitled to medical assistance (therapy, insurance covered medicine, medical check-ups due to taking said medicine, etc) and help if possible (more time on tests, the ability to wear noise cancelling headphones at work, etc).
Now do I feel like I don’t want to have ADHD? That is a totally different question and I would most likely actually answer with no. ADHD is a part of my identity and although I may struggle in many parts of my life and sometimes wish to be “normal” because of it I still see that there are many benefits due to having ADHD. ADHD is both a disability and an ability. Risk taking can also often lead to success, one of the reasons why many with ADHD start their own buisnesses. ADHD makes you creative, I do not think Einstein would have come up with the theory of relativity if not for his ADHD typical symptoms. ADHD gives you the ability to hyper focus and achieve a level proficiency in fields many neurotypical never reach. ADHD has lead me to be a more social person and a good public speaker since I can talk with no end and have been dancing out of line so often that I am much less afraid of rejection than most people. ADHD makes you open and often funny in my opinion. ADHD, although often unwillingly, makes you a more truthful person. ADHD has beaten me down in life often but exactly because of that I am a more empathic, driven person. Since I have kept an open mind and am a quite self-aware person (maybe even due to being reprimanded so often because of ADHD), that did not want to feel and be treated poorly anymore and not know why, I actually massively grew as a person in every aspect of my social and emotional life. ADHD made me curious and I have gained a wealth of knowledge on many topics and usually if I am actually interested in something I become great at it very quickly relative to most neurotypical people due to how much time and effort I am able or sometimes even mentally forced to invest. Here is one of the more extreme examples I can think of: I have a great interest in history, but in class I never did my homework, I never took notes, I did not read the hand outs, they bored me. I simply listened passively or discussed with my teacher and often watched youtube vieos that I found interesting. I graduated top of my class in history and made my senior thesis a history paper, written in my second language English, that analyses specific historical events, their judicial treatment and the effects on society aswell as modern day geopolitics. My teachers at the time told me I would probably be able to hand in the 50 page paper as my bachelor’s thesis if I ever wanted to study history. There may be many more benefits but I think at this point I would like to end my reply and simply state if you manage to find that prostetic environment that you do need as a person suffering from ADHD you will thrive but that needs a previous acknowledgement by your environment and especially by you.

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Welcome I don’t have enough time to read this but @vh0622 if I forget to come back within a day!! (typical adhd lol)

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Welcome to the forums @AKi! I hope that you keep coming back and participating here.

Wow! I think yours is one of the longer posts I’ve read on this forum.

Yes, I agree that ADHD should be considered a disability based on the negative impact is traits can have on an individual, but that or also comes with traits which can be beneficial.

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@AKi

Loved your post! Not too long at all! In fact, may I copy it and possibly use many of these points at work if I need to? As in, if I need to justify why I should keep my job when my contract runs out :grinning:

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Oh yeah, I get the point (that it’s important to recognize that ADHD is legitimately considered a disability, due to the detrimental impact it can have). But I just resist it anyway. I don’t disagree, but I’m in a contrary mood. So, right now, I don’t think of my ADHD as a disability, I think of the rest of the world as inadequate for the fact that they’re all very bad at handling me. Harrumph!

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Wait I can’t read I have previously made my comment based on in general and only now do I see the word “your” sooo…

I find my ADHD to be a bit disabling when I can’t get work done on time and I try to apologize and then can’t fix it. Also when I struggle with my executive functions I find my ADHD debilitating. I am glad tho that I am getting some accommodations in school and the school may help me seek out a diagnosis after Covid is over.

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